Saturday, March 31, 2012

Using a laptop with solar power

Hamish from Visionon.tv explains how to use a solar powered laptop

This is a new 32W panel which is more than my older 25W panel, and runs a bigger laptop.Rugged folding 32.2W solar panel. 18 to 20VDC open circuit voltage. Current 2.4A in full sun. Cigarette socket connector. 16" X 10" folded; 14" X 44" unfolded. 1 1/2 inches thick folded. 6 pound 4 oz weight. Eyelets at each corner and at panel middle to allow mounting or suspension with rope or bungee cords. Very durable and rugged. Ripstop camouflage nylon enclosure. Take this panel anywhere. No glass. Advantages over thin film: open circuit voltage 18-22VDC (thin film tends to be 15 to 16VDC, as panel heats in sun or if in hot climates voltage for thin film panels drops and you may not charge efficiently or at all). Also thin panels are much less efficient. Substantially larger area for comparable outputs.

He uses a 7AH lead acid battery, it is used as a voltage buffer and as a reservoir of power. The cables are a 240v inverter, AA battery charger, Volt meter.
Read more here

Undercurrents is an award winning alternative news service producing videos of people taking inspiring actions. http://www.undercurrents.org

4 comments:

Electrical Hub-uk said...

This is the first time I have ever heard of a solar powered laptop.Will they become popular do you think?

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Rufus Cole said...

I was never under the impression that solar power could be able to generate enough voltage to run a laptop. Surely being outside when using it provides a problem though when it comes to screen glare? Regardless it seems like a great innovation and could be essential when performing tasks in third world countries with no AC access.



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pv installation said...

Solar panels are getting more attention now a days as the electricity generated by PV is absolutely free because sunlight is free, so once you've paid for the initial installation your electricity costs will be reduced.

bobo said...

That is so cool. Do you know if that would be good for people in Africa? I have heard they have kinetic energy powered laptops now, but i was wondering if they could use commercial solar pv devon as well.