Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Undercurrents in New York show

Undercurrents films will be show during New York Video Activist Weekly Screenings (Sept 30-Dec 6, 2008)

Signs of Change:Social Movement Cultures 1960s to Now
curated by Dara Greenwald and Josh MacPhee

September 20 – December 6, 2008
(closed Oct 14-18)
Film/Video Weekend: Oct 11-13
Provo/Autonomedia Night Oct 24
1. full listing here: http://www.exitart.org/site/pub/
exhibition_programs/signs_of_change/film_screenings.html


SIGNS OF CHANGE: WEEKLY FILM/VIDEO SCREENINGS
AT EXIT UNDERGROUND, TUES-THURS 3:30 PM, FRI-SAT 5:30 PM
EXIT ART 475 Tenth Avenue New York 10018
212.966.7745 www.exitart.org

SEPTEMBER 30 – OCTOBER 4: No Nukes, No Way!
Stronger Than Before
(1983, 27:00 minutes, the Boston Women’s Video Collective, courtesy
of the Boston Women’s Video Collective)
This film documents the militant actions and creative activities of
the Women’s Encampment for a Future of Peace and Justice in Seneca,
New York in 1983.
Although the Boston Women’s Video Collective was formed specifically
to document this encampment, they continued producing video projects
after it closed.

Carry Greenham Home
(1984, 66:00 minutes, Beeban Kidron and Amanda Richardson, courtesy
of Women
Make Movies)
Carry Greenham Home is an on-the-ground look at the activities of the
Greenham Common Women’s Encampment. The film focuses not just on the
women’s anti-nuclear and anti-military actions, but also on the
feminist practices on which their lives were based.


OCTOBER 7 – 10: Popular Uprisings
Korea: Until Daybreak
(a segment of …will be televised, 1990, 58:00 minutes, Deep Dish TV,
Hye Jung Park and the Han-Kyoreh One Korea, One People Video
Collective, courtesy of the Deep Dish TV Archives)
This compilation includes grassroots footage from multiple protests
in South Korea in the 1980s, including the massive Gwang-ju uprising,
militant workers and farmers, and fights for Korean unification.
Korea: Until Daybreak is just one segment from the series ...will be
televised: Video Documents From Asia that was coordinated and
produced by Shu Lea Cheang for Deep Dish TV. The first public access
satellite network, Deep Dish TV was launched in 1986 by Paper Tiger
TV as a way to link independent producers, activists and viewers who
support movements for social change.

Un Poquito de Tanta Verdad / A Little Bit of So Much Truth
(2007, 93:00 minutes, produced by Corrugated Films in collaboration
with Mal de Ojo, courtesy of Corrugated Films)
In the summer of 2006, a teachers' strike exploded into a popular
uprising in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca. This film captures
the unique media story that emerged when tens of thousands of
schoolteachers, housewives, indigenous communities, health workers,
farmers, and students took 14 radio stations and one TV station into
their own hands and used them for the needs of the people. Mal de Ojo
TV is a coalition of independent, indigenous and community media
workers, including Indymedia-Oaxaca and Ojo de Agua Comunicación. Mal
de Ojo produces and distributes media related to the movement.
Corrugated Films with Jill Freidburg collaborated with them on this
project.

OCTOBER 14 – 18: EXIT ART IS CLOSED FOR AN EVENT

OCTOBER 21 – 25 All Power to the People
Mayday (Black Panther)
(1969, 13:30 minutes, Newsreel, courtesy of Roz Payne Archives)
On May 1, 1969, International Workers Day, the Black Panther Party
held a massive rally in San Francisco to help free Huey P. Newton.
From the compilation: What We Want, What We Believe: The Black
Panther Party Library. Newsreel films, founded in the late 1960s, was
composed of decentralized film collectives that produced films
dealing with such issues as the Vietnam War, civil rights, anti-
imperialism and alternative culture.

The Young Lords Film / El Pueblo Se Levanta
(1971, 50:00 minutes, Newsreel, courtesy of Roz Payne Archives)
For over a year and a half, a Newsreel crew worked closely with the
Young Lords Party, a chapter of the Puerto Rican nationalist and
civil rights group. The film documents their many programs and plans
for Puerto Rican communities.


OCTOBER 28 – NOVEMBER 1: Engaged Global Counter Cultures
Five Days for Peace US PREMIERE
(1973, 37:00 minutes, Nils Vest, courtesy of Christiania, Copenhagen)
In Five Days for Peace, the members of SOLVOGNEN — the theater
collective from the squatted free town of Christiania, Copenhagen,
Denmark — dress as North American Treaty Organization (NATO) troops
and perform “military” operations in Copenhagen during the NATO Summit.

Indonesia: Art, Activism, and Rock ‘n’ Roll
(2002, 26:00 minutes, Charlie Hill Smith and Jamie Nicolal, in
Indonesian and English with English subtitles, courtesy of Marcom
Projects)
This documentary film follows Taring Padi, an art collective based
out of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Since 1998, the group has produced
posters, murals, street performances, puppets, poetry, music, and
published a newsletter. They describe themselves as an "independent
non-profit cultural community, which is based on the concept of
peoples' culture." They are committed to contributing to autonomous
culture, democracy, and social justice in Indonesia.

People's Park
(1969, 25:00 minutes, Newsreel, courtesy of Roz Payne Archives)
This film documents the struggle over People's Park in Berkeley,
California. In 1969, a vacant tract of University-owned land was
occupied by community residents, who began to convert it into a
"people's park" and a place for political organizing. Hundreds helped
to clear the land, plant flowers and trees, and some even set up
tents and started living there. Within a month, the University set
the site for demolition, and police surrounded the area with an eight-
foot tall fence. Approximately 3,000 protestors tried to reclaim the
park, the area was in chaos, and police shot at the crowds. Hundreds
were wounded by rioting or gunfire, one student was killed. Ronald
Reagan called in the National Guard, who occupied the city for
seventeen days.


NOVEMBER 4 – 8: Be the Media
Lanesville Overview 1
(1972, excerpt, Videofreex, courtesy of the artists and Video Data Bank)
A behind the scenes look at America’s first pirate television
station, Lanesville TV. Between 1972 and 1977, the Videofreex aired
over 250 television broadcasts from their hand-built studio.
Videofreex, founded in 1969, was one of the first video collectives
in the US. The collective made videos dealing with such issues as
civil rights, women’s rights, television, and alternative culture.

Be a DIVA
(1990, 28:00 minutes, DIVA TV, courtesy of Deep Dish TV)
This tape includes clips from a variety of DIVA (Damn Interfering
Video Activists) TV programs. DIVA TV was one of several video groups
that emerged from ACT UP (Aids Coalition To Unleash Power). The first
public access satellite network, Deep Dish TV was launched in 1986 by
Paper Tiger TV as a way to link independent producers, activists and
viewers who support movements for social change.

I the film
(2006, 84:00 minutes, Andres Ingoglia and Raphael Lyon, Spanish and
English, Courtesy of the artists)
This film is about Indymedia, a grassroots, independent media
network, and specifically focuses on Indymedia Argentina. The film
documents demonstrations after the collapse of the Argentine economy--
independent media played a major role in helping to organize the
protesters. The film also reveals the growth of social movements
transforming Argentine society, and functioning outside of government
political structures.

NOVEMBER 11 – 15 Student Solidarity
What the Fuck are These Red Squares?
(1970, 15:00 minutes, Kartemquin Film Collective, courtesy of
Kartemquin Films)
Documentary of students during a "revolutionary seminar" at the Art
Institute of Chicago during the 1970 national student strike that was
call in response to the invasion of Cambodia and the killing of
students at Kent and Jackson State Universities. The students raised
questions related to artists' roles in a capitalist economic system,
such as: "Is it possible not to be co-opted, as ‘radical’ as one’s
art may be? What are the connections between money and art in
America? Between the ‘New York Scene’ and the rest of the country?”
Kartemquin Films, best known for its award-winning documentary Hoop
Dreams (1994), was once known as Kartemquin Film Collective. The
collective made social and politically charged films about various
issues in Chicago including labor, gentrification, and student
protests. They also collaborated with members of Newsreel.

The Columbia University Divestment Struggle: Paper Tiger at Mandela
Hall, (1985, 28:00 minutes, Paper Tiger Television, courtesy of Paper
Tiger Television Collective)
In 1985 there was a nationwide campaign calling for corporations and
institutions to divest from South Africa as part of the anti-
apartheid movement. In solidarity with this campaign, student
protestors at Columbia University occupied a hall to demand that the
university sever its ties to businesses with investments in South
Africa. Paper Tiger Televison is a collectively run, alternative
media producer in New York City.

Standing with Palestine
(2004, 12:00 minutes, Paper Tiger Television, courtesy of Paper Tiger
Television Collective)
Standing with Palestine documents the grassroots movement in the
United States in support of the Palestinian people and against the
Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The video
includes interviews with groups such as the International Solidarity
Movement (ISM) and campus activists who are working on a campaign
(based on the successful student Divestment campaigns against
Apartheid South Africa in the 1980's) to force universities to
withdraw their ties to companies that support the Israeli Occupation.

Standing with the Students
(2007, 23:00 minutes, Sphinx in cooperation with Sin Fronteras Media
Collective and
Indymedia Amazonia, courtesy of the artist)
In 2005 students at the University of Buea in Cameroon organized to
demand more educational resources and basic human rights. The
Cameroon government violently attacked them, killing five. This video
was shot with a cell phone and the footage was snuck out of the country.


NOVEMBER 18 – 22: Globalize Resistance
A Very Big Train Called The Other Campaign / Un tren muy grande que
se llama: La Otra Campaña
(2006, 39:00 minutes,Caracoles Productions, Spanish with English
subtitles, courtesy of Chiapas Media Project/Promedios)
This video was produced by indigenous video makers from four of the
five Zapatista Caracoles in Chiapas, Mexico. It documents the 2006
planning and organizing of the Other Campaign. This was a campaign by
the Zapatista Army of National Liberation to build a self-governing
national infrastructure. For over a decade, the Chiapas Media Project
has partnered with indigenous and campesino (farm worker) communities
in Chiapas and Guerrero, Mexico to provide video production and
computer equipment and training.

Crowd Bites Wolf
(2001, 22:00 minutes, Guerillavision, NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0)
Part fictive-narrative, part protest-documentary, Crowd Bites Wolf
tells the story of the protest against the 2001 meeting of the
International Monetary Fund in Prague, Czech Republic.

Fourth World War
(2003, 76:00 minutes, Big Noise Films, courtesy of Big Noise Films)
This documentary takes viewers around the world--Mexico, Argentina,
South Africa, Palestine, Korea, Italy, Afghanistan, and Iraq--to
reveal people fighting against war and corporate domination. Big
Noise Films is a volunteer media collective that was first
established to document the Zapatista uprising in Chiapas, Mexico and
has continued making social movement media ever since.

DECEMBER 4-6: Videos About Land and Housing Struggles
Newe Segobia is Not for Sale: The Struggle for Western Shoshone Land
(1993, 29:00 minutes, Jesse Drew, courtesy of the artist and Video
Data Bank)
This video documents a confrontation between Western Shoshone
ranchers, sisters Carrie and Mary Dann, and the U.S. Federal Bureau
of Land Management (BLM) over disputed grazing lands. The Dann
sisters purchased a video camera to document the BLM’s misconduct.
Filmmaker Jesse Drew was given the unedited footage and created a
documentary that was distributed by Native American activists and
public access stations to gain support for the Western Shoshone
struggle. Though this incident involved only a few people, it is part
of the ongoing battle for Native North American land rights.

The Land Belongs to Those Who Work It/La tierra es de quien la
trabaja (2005, 15:00 minutes,Caracol V, Northern Zone, in Spanish and
Tzeltal with English subtitles, courtesy of Chiapas Media Project/
Promedios)
For over a decade, the Chiapas Media Project has partnered with
indigenous and campesino (farm worker) communities in Chiapas and
Guerrero, Mexico to provide video production and computer equipment
and training. This film from the Chiapas Media Project documents a
meeting between Zapatista authorities and Mexican government
officials to discuss the sale of land to a private eco-tourism
company without permission from the local community.

Uku Hamba 'Ze - To Walk Naked
(1995, 12:00 minutes, Jaqueline Maingard, Sheila Meintjes and Heather
Thompson, courtesy of Third World Newsreel)
After an exhausting fight to procure housing, a group of women in
Soweto, South Africa built a settlement of makeshift shacks. When
police tried to evict them with bulldozers and dogs, the women
defiantly stripped naked in a peaceful protest against the
destruction of their homes. This unconventional action gained massive
media attention and caught the attention of filmmakers who documented
the struggle in Uku Hamba ‘Ze / To Walk Naked.

IndyMedia Brazil Inside an MST Camp
(2002, 10:00 minutes, Indymedia Brazil, courtesy of Indymedia Brazil)
Brazil's Landless Workers Movement, Movimento dos Trabalhadores
Rurais Sem Terra (MST), is the largest social movement in Latin
America with an estimated 1.5 million members. This short documentary
represents an MST camp from the inside. Some 12,000 families, who
work together to oversee security and governance, occupy this
territory. The documentary features the workers’ abilities to self-
govern, provide food, child care, and housing for all, and to deal
with unwanted visits from government officials and mainstream media.
Indymedia is a global network of grassroots reporters and citizens
who cover issues and events important to diverse social movements.

Break and Enter
(1970, 42 min, Newsreel, courtesy of Third World Newsreel)
Break and Enter captures the efforts of several hundred Puerto Rican
and Dominican families to take over and live in abandoned buildings
in New York City. Third World Newsreel developed out of the
progressive social movements of the 1960s. Established in New York in
1967 as an activist filmmaking collective, it grew to have a network
of national chapters. These chapters would produce short 16mm films
that would counter the way events and issues were being presented in
the mainstream media. Today three Newsreel organizations remain:
Third World Newsreel in New York, California Newsreel in San
Francisco, and Vermont Newsreel Archives.
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2. Signs of Change Weekend of Screenings and Discussion co-sponsored
by 16beaver group, October 11-13, 2008, http://www.16beavergroup.org/
events/archives/002615.php

SATURDAY, October 11 at Exit Art, 475 10th Ave @ 36th Street
4 pm: Finally Got the News
(1970, 55:00 minutes, shown on 16 mm, League of Revolutionary Black
Workers, Stewart Bird, Rene Lichtman and Peter Gessner, courtesy of
the American Friends’ Service Committee)
A Newsreel crew heads to Detroit to document the League of
Revolutionary Black Workers. The League decides to take the means of
production into their own hands to represent themselves and their
struggle. The League of Revolutionary Black Workers came out of the
autonomous organizing of Black unions in Detroit-based automotive
plants which included DRUM (Dodge Revolutionary Union Movement) and
CRUM (Chrysler Revolutionary Union Movement). The League critiqued
the racist practices of the United Auto Workers and called for an
analysis of the role of the Black working class in revolutionary
struggles in the United States.

Plus: McStrike-Paris, 4:05 min, 2005, Victor Muh, Precarity DVD -
Magazine Made In collaboration with: P2Pfightsharing Crew
www.fightsharing.net, Greenpepper Project, Amsterdam
wwww.greenpeppermagazine.org, and Candida TV, Roma www.candidatv.tv
McDonald's workers go on strike in Paris, occupying their workplace
(a McDonald's restaurant) for six months.

7:30 pm: Narita: Peasants of the Second Fortress / Sanrizuka:
Dainitoride No Hitobito
(1971, 02:23:00 minutes, shown on 16 mm, Shinsuke Ogawa/Ogawa
Productions, Japanese with English subtitles, courtesy of the Athénée
Français Cultural Center)

Introduced by Barbara Hammer, filmmaker and Sabu Kohso, Japan-born
writer and activist

"In Japan, guerilla film activity reached high intensity during the
war (Vietnam).The use made of Japan as a conduit for Vietnam war
supplies generated strong anti-government feelings and many 'protest
films.'...It now saw such powerful films as the Sanrizuka series-
three feature length films. The heavy air traffic through Japan-
swollen by the war-hap prompted a 1966 decision to build a new
international airport for Tokyo.The area chosen, Sanrizuka, was
occupied by farmers who were determined to block seizures of their
lands. For four years, the film maker Shinsuke Ogawa documented their
struggle, which reached its climax in the third film, The Peasants of
the Second Fortress. Here we see resistance turning into a pitched
battle with riot police as farm women chain themselves to
impoverished stockades, and students join the struggle for anti-
government, anti-war motives. Ogawa, patiently recording the growth
of resistance...achieved an extraordinary social document, and one of
the most potent of protest films." - Erik Barnouw, Documentary: A
History of the Non-Fiction Film, (Oxford University Press, 1974)

Ogawa Productions was a Japanese filmmaking collective that was
founded in the 1960’s, It was directed by Ogawa Shinsuke. After
making films about the student movement, the collective moved to
Sanrizuka to cover the struggle against the building of the Narita
Airport. While there, they made eight films covering the struggle.

Screening co-sponsored by Asian/Pacific/American Institute and Tisch
Department of Photography & Imaging at NYU in conjunction with The
Uses of 1968: Legacies of Art and Activism Symposium and 1968: Then
and Now Exhibition.


SUNDAY October 12th AT 16 Beaver, 4th Floor
16 Beaver Group, 16 Beaver Street, Fourth Floor, New York, NY 10004,
212.480.2093
$5-$10 donation a day to cover bagels, coffee, and dinner

12-1:00 Coffee and Bagels
1:00- 1:30 Introduction and Welcome
Re-Framing Signs of Change: Focus on Documentary Media
The curators and organizers of the event will introduce the general
ideas and format for the weekend's screenings and discussions.

1:30- 4:00 Movement Media: Radical Form/Radical Politics
This session will examine some of the "greatest hits" of political
non-fiction film that are frequently invoked when talking about
social documentary or revolutionary cinema. Unlike a traditional
screening, the program will consist of a series of clips from and a
number of "revolutionary" film and videomakers. Each of which has
been chosen in order to raise a series of questions about the form
and function of media in relation to movements.The discussion will be
facilitated by the organizers.

4:30-7:30 Speaking Out Against War
Queen Mother Moore Speech at Green Haven Prison
(1973, 17:00 minutes, People’s Communication Network [co-founded by
Elaine Baly and Bill Stevens], courtesy of Chris Hill and Bob Devine)
Think Tank, a self-organized group of prisoners at Green Haven
Prison, coordinated a community day with outside activists. This tape
captures a powerful speech by one of the guest speakers: Queen Mother
Moore, a follower of Marcus Garvey, founder of the Universal Negro
Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA-ACL).
People's Communication Network, a community video group founded by
Bill Stevens, documented the event for cablecast in New York City.

Winter Soldier
(1972, 96:00 minutes, Winter Film Collective)
Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) organized the "Winter Soldier
Investigation" in the winter of 1971. Veterans from all over the
United States came together in Michigan to talk about their
experiences in Vietnam and to give eye-witness testimony of the war
crimes and atrocities that they witnessed and participated in. This
film captures the discussions before, during and after the official
"hearing" and displays the impact of the war's brutality on the
American GI's. A document of the Anti-War movement, the film
chronicles some of the difficulties that the organizers faced and the
film itself had a hard time finding an audience in the US at the time
of its production. In collaboration with the VVAW, a number of
filmmakers came together to document the "Winter Soldier
Investigation" and to make a film, the group called itself
Winterfilm. Collectively and anonymously, they filmed the proceedings
and then edited their footage into a powerful piece that was
conceived as an organizing tool. The film screened at a number of
film festivals in Europe as well.

Winter Soldier: Iraq and Afghanistan
(2008, 30:00 minutes, Big Noise Films, courtesy of Big Noise Films)
In 2008, Iraq Veterans Against the War (IVAW) restaged the Winter
Soldier hearings to testify to the world the injustices of the war.

Port Huron Project 4: Ceasar Chavez, Mark Tribe, 2008, 5 minutes
Part of a series of re-enactments of "New Left" speeches from the
late 60's and early 70's, this video documents a performance by
Ricardo Dominguez of an important speech made by Ceasar Chavez, the
leader of the United Farm Workers Union, in 1971. Organized by Mark
Tribe, this project seeks to call attention to the resonances between
past political action and protest speeches and contemporary political
situations. The re-enactment took place in July of 2008 at the
original site where Chavez delivered his speech in which he connected
the war in Vietnam to the struggles of farm workers and issues of
domestic violence in the United States.

8 pm Dinner and a Movie
Stronger Than Before
(1983, 27:00 minutes, the Boston Women’s Video Collective, courtesy
of the Boston Women’s Video Collective)
This film documents the militant actions and creative activities of
the Women’s Encampment for a Future of Peace and Justice in Seneca,
New York in 1983.
Although the Boston Women’s Video Collective was formed specifically
to document this encampment, they continued producing video projects
after it closed.

Fourth World War
(2003, 76:00 minutes, Big Noise Films, courtesy of Big Noise Films)
This documentary takes viewers around the world--Mexico, Argentina,
South Africa, Palestine, Korea, Italy, Afghanistan, and Iraq--to
reveal people fighting against war and corporate domination. Big
Noise Films is a volunteer media collective that was first
established to document the Zapatista uprising in Chiapas, Mexico and
has continued making social movement media ever since.


MONDAY October 13th at 16beaver
12-1:00 Coffee and Bagels
1:30 -4:00 Artists & Action: Documents of Creative Resistance
Happy Anniversary, San Francisco, March 20-21, 2003, 4:30 min, 2004,
Benj Gerdes
This video was shot part of a collective effort to videotape anti-
war direct action protests in San Francisco during the first two days
of the war on Iraq. Most of the video shot over this two day period
was initially used as documentation for legal rather than media/
documentary purposes. In this edit, every clip is the same length.
They are shown in the order they were recorded in order to challenge
more common activist editing techniques that imitate mainstream
television pacing, and thus ask something different of the audience.

What the Fuck are These Red Squares?
(1970, 15:00 minutes, Kartemquin Film Collective, courtesy of
Kartemquin Films)
Documentary of students during a "revolutionary seminar" at the Art
Institute of Chicago during the 1970 national student strike that was
call in response to the invasion of Cambodia and the killing of
students at Kent and Jackson State Universities. The students raised
questions related to artists' roles in a capitalist economic system,
such as: "Is it possible not to be co-opted, as ‘radical’ as one’s
art may be? What are the connections between money and art in
America? Between the ‘New York Scene’ and the rest of the country?”
Kartemquin Films, best known for its award-winning documentary Hoop
Dreams (1994), was once known as Kartemquin Film Collective. The
collective made social and politically charged films about various
issues in Chicago including labor, gentrification, and student
protests. They also collaborated with members of Newsreel.

Five Days for Peace US PREMIERE
(1973, 37:00 minutes, Nils Vest, courtesy of Christiania, Copenhagen)
In Five Days for Peace, the members of SOLVOGNEN — the theater
collective from the squatted free town of Christiania, Copenhagen,
Denmark — dress as North American Treaty Organization (NATO) troops
and perform “military” operations in Copenhagen during the NATO
Summit. FILMMAKER WILL BE PRESENT
More works TBA

4:30 - 6:30 Dispatches from The Counter-Globalization Movement
A Very Big Train Called The Other Campaign / Un tren muy grande que
se llama: La Otra Campaña
(2006, 39:00 minutes, Chiapas Media Project, Spanish with English
subtitles, courtesy of Chiapas Media Project/Promedios)
This video was produced by indigenous video makers from four of the
five Zapatista Caracoles in Chiapas, Mexico. It documents the 2006
planning and organizing of the Other Campaign. This was a campaign by
the Zapatista Army of National Liberation to build a self-governing
national infrastructure. For over a decade, the Chiapas Media Project
has partnered with indigenous and campesino (farm worker) communities
in Chiapas and Guerrero, Mexico to provide video production and
computer equipment and training.

Crowd Bites Wolf
(2001, 22:00 minutes, Guerillavision, NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0)
Part fictive-narrative, part protest-documentary, Crowd Bites Wolf
tells the story of the protest against the 2001 meeting of the
International Monetary Fund in Prague, Czech Republic.

What Would It Mean to Win? US PREMIERE
(2008, 40:00 minutes, German and English, Zanny Begg and Oliver
Ressler, courtesy of
the artists)
This film — shot at the G8 Summit protests in Heiligendamm, Germany
in June 2007 — asks activists in the counter-globalization movement
to answer the question: “What would it mean to win?” Featuring
interviews with protestors and with John Holloway, whose 2002 book
Change the World Without Taking Power was influential to the movement.

7:30 Dinner and One More Movie
Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance
(1993, 01:59:00 minutes, Alanis Obomsawin, courtesy of Bullfrog Films)
This documentary covers the two and half month armed stand-off
between members of the Mohawk Nation, the Québec police, and the
Canadian army. The Mohawks are fighting to keep their land as a
commons against the development interests of a private golf course.


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3. Installed Videos - looping the duration of the show

(monitor 1)
Gimme an Occupation with that McStrike
(2005, 04:05 minutes, Victor Muh, Precarity DV/–Magazine, made in
collaboration with: P2Pfightsharing Crew; Greenpepper Project,
Amsterdam;
and Candida TV, Rome)
McDonald's workers go on strike in Paris, occupying their workplace (a
McDonald's restaurant) for six months.

Richmond Strike
(1969, Newsreel, courtesy of Roz Payne Archives)
In January l969, local police in Northern California attacked
striking oil
workers and their families, killing one person and injuring many others.
Student protestors from San Francisco State University were asked to
join
the struggle, uniting workers and students against a common foe. This
film includes interviews with employees on strike and against Shell
Oil in
Martinez and Richmond, California.

(monitor 2)
Repression
(13:33 minutes, Newsreel, courtesy of Roz Payne Archives)
A documentary about the Los Angeles Black Panther Party with music by
Elaine Brown.

Queen Mother Moore Speech at Green Haven Prison
(1973, 17:00 minutes, People’s Communication Network [co-founded by
Elaine Baly and Bill Stevens], courtesy of Chris Hill and Bob Devine)
Think Tank, a self-organized group of prisoners at Green Haven
Prison, coordinated a community day with outside activists. This tape
captures a powerful speech by one of the guest speakers: Queen Mother
Moore, a follower of Marcus Garvey, founder of the Universal Negro
Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA-ACL).
People's Communication Network, a community video group founded by
Bill Stevens, documented the event for cablecast in New York City.

(monitor 3)
Up Against the Wall Ms. America
(1968, 08:00 minutes, Newsreel, courtesy of Roz Payne Archives)
This film documents a creative Women’s Liberation protest outside the
1968 Miss America Pageant in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Women’s Lib Demonstration I
(1970, 05:00 minute excerpt, Videofreex, courtesy of Video Data Bank
and the VideoFreex Partnership)
Documentation of the 1970 Women's Liberation march in New York City,
part of the "national women's strike for equality" called to
commemorate the 50th anniversary of women's suffrage. Demonstrators
include members of Women’s Strike for Peace. Videofreex was an early
video collective, which existed from 1969-1977. During that time, the
collective documented the counterculture and social movements,
experimented with new video technology, ran a pirate television
station, and produced over 1,500 tapes.

Purple Dinosaur Action Segment
(1973, 10:00 minutes, Barbara Jabaily, Tracy Fitz and Lesbians
Organized for Video Experience (L.O.V.E), courtesy of the Lesbian
Herstory Educational Foundation, Inc.)
In this film members of the Lesbian Feminist Liberation (LFL) create
a large, purple, papier-mâché dinosaur and wheel it to the Museum of
Natural History in New York to protest the patriarchal values and
histories presented by the museum. They are accompanied by the
Victoria Woodhall Marching Band, a lesbian marching band that
performed at protests and senior centers. L.O.V.E. documented many of
the activities organized by LFL, including the New York City Lesbian
Olympics and this action at the Museum of Natural History.

(monitor 4)
South Africa: Freedom Rising
(1978, 20:00 minutes, audio slideshow, ITT Boycott and the Dayton
Community Media Workshop, courtesy of the American Friends’ Service
Committee)
This slide show was produced to educate Americans on the injustice of
the apartheid system in South Africa and the presence of US
corporations in that country. It serves to illustrate one of the many
ways grassroots movements used technology that was accessible to them
to get the message out. The Dayton Community Media Workshop described
itself as “a collective of artists working within the New American
Movement.”

(monitor 5)
Indonesia: Art, Activism, and Rock ‘n’ Roll
(2002, 26:00 minutes, Charlie Hill Smith and Jamie Nicolal, in
Indonesian and English with English subtitles, courtesy of Marcom
Projects)
This documentary film follows Taring Padi, an art collective based
out of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Since 1998, the group has produced
posters, murals, street performances, puppets, poetry, and music and
has published a newsletter. They describe themselves as an
"independent non-profit cultural community, which is based on the
concept of peoples' culture." They are committed to contributing to
autonomous culture, democracy, and social justice in Indonesia.

(monitor 6)
It Can Be Done
(1974, 32:00 minutes, Shirley Jensen and Barbara Bejna with the
Chicago Women’s Graphic Collective, courtesy of Kartemquin Films and
Shirley Jensen)
This documentary follows the Chicago Women’s Liberation Print Shop as
it makes a poster for United Farm Workers. These artists, women, and
activists talk about their collective process and the political
relevance of this project within the women’s movement and other
political campaigns.

(monitor 7)
TXTmob - Nw Mor Thn Evr
(2004, the Institute for Applied Autonomy, courtesy of the Institute
for Applied Autonomy)
Documentation of creative uses of a text messaging service devised to
assist protest communications. The Institute for Applied Autonomy
(IAA) is an arts and engineering collective founded in 1998 devoted
to developing “technologies which extend the autonomy of human
activists.”

(monitor 8)
Reclaim the Streets
(1996, 07:00 minutes, Undercurrents, courtesy of Undercurrents)
Undercurrents is an alternative news organization that has documented
social movements in the United Kingdom since 1994. This film
documents a Reclaim the Streets Party-Protest.

Sound Demo
(03:11 minutes, Japanese Activism DVD, courtesy of ill commonz)
A sound demo from Reclaim the Streets, Japan.

Transistor Connected Drum Collective
(06:49 minutes, illcommonz, courtesy illcommonz)
Japanese experimental musicians reclaim the streets of Tokyo to
protest the war in Iraq.

(projected)
Iraq Veterans Against the War: Operation First Casualty
(2008, 5 minutes, Elizabeth Press for Democracy Now)
Iraq Veterans Against the War (IVAW) is a national organization
formed in
2004 by veterans of the Iraq War. Operation First Casualty (OFC) is a
street
theater project that members of the organization perform dressed in
military
uniforms. OFC stages performances that are reenactments of combat
patrols on
the streets of US cities, as they would happen in Iraq, to bring the
realities of war home. In this document they perform OFC outside the
Democratic National Convention in Denver 2008.


http://www.exitart.org/site/pub/exhibition_programs/signs_of_change/
index.html#about
Exit Art is located at 475 Tenth Avenue, corner of 36th Street in
New York City

and
Miller Gallery, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA
Jan. 23–March 8, 2009
Jan. 23, 6-8pm: Reception

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