Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Undercurrents in New York show

Undercurrents films will be show during New York Video Activist Weekly Screenings (Sept 30-Dec 6, 2008)

Signs of Change:Social Movement Cultures 1960s to Now
curated by Dara Greenwald and Josh MacPhee

September 20 – December 6, 2008
(closed Oct 14-18)
Film/Video Weekend: Oct 11-13
Provo/Autonomedia Night Oct 24
1. full listing here: http://www.exitart.org/site/pub/
exhibition_programs/signs_of_change/film_screenings.html


SIGNS OF CHANGE: WEEKLY FILM/VIDEO SCREENINGS
AT EXIT UNDERGROUND, TUES-THURS 3:30 PM, FRI-SAT 5:30 PM
EXIT ART 475 Tenth Avenue New York 10018
212.966.7745 www.exitart.org

SEPTEMBER 30 – OCTOBER 4: No Nukes, No Way!
Stronger Than Before
(1983, 27:00 minutes, the Boston Women’s Video Collective, courtesy
of the Boston Women’s Video Collective)
This film documents the militant actions and creative activities of
the Women’s Encampment for a Future of Peace and Justice in Seneca,
New York in 1983.
Although the Boston Women’s Video Collective was formed specifically
to document this encampment, they continued producing video projects
after it closed.

Carry Greenham Home
(1984, 66:00 minutes, Beeban Kidron and Amanda Richardson, courtesy
of Women
Make Movies)
Carry Greenham Home is an on-the-ground look at the activities of the
Greenham Common Women’s Encampment. The film focuses not just on the
women’s anti-nuclear and anti-military actions, but also on the
feminist practices on which their lives were based.


OCTOBER 7 – 10: Popular Uprisings
Korea: Until Daybreak
(a segment of …will be televised, 1990, 58:00 minutes, Deep Dish TV,
Hye Jung Park and the Han-Kyoreh One Korea, One People Video
Collective, courtesy of the Deep Dish TV Archives)
This compilation includes grassroots footage from multiple protests
in South Korea in the 1980s, including the massive Gwang-ju uprising,
militant workers and farmers, and fights for Korean unification.
Korea: Until Daybreak is just one segment from the series ...will be
televised: Video Documents From Asia that was coordinated and
produced by Shu Lea Cheang for Deep Dish TV. The first public access
satellite network, Deep Dish TV was launched in 1986 by Paper Tiger
TV as a way to link independent producers, activists and viewers who
support movements for social change.

Un Poquito de Tanta Verdad / A Little Bit of So Much Truth
(2007, 93:00 minutes, produced by Corrugated Films in collaboration
with Mal de Ojo, courtesy of Corrugated Films)
In the summer of 2006, a teachers' strike exploded into a popular
uprising in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca. This film captures
the unique media story that emerged when tens of thousands of
schoolteachers, housewives, indigenous communities, health workers,
farmers, and students took 14 radio stations and one TV station into
their own hands and used them for the needs of the people. Mal de Ojo
TV is a coalition of independent, indigenous and community media
workers, including Indymedia-Oaxaca and Ojo de Agua Comunicación. Mal
de Ojo produces and distributes media related to the movement.
Corrugated Films with Jill Freidburg collaborated with them on this
project.

OCTOBER 14 – 18: EXIT ART IS CLOSED FOR AN EVENT

OCTOBER 21 – 25 All Power to the People
Mayday (Black Panther)
(1969, 13:30 minutes, Newsreel, courtesy of Roz Payne Archives)
On May 1, 1969, International Workers Day, the Black Panther Party
held a massive rally in San Francisco to help free Huey P. Newton.
From the compilation: What We Want, What We Believe: The Black
Panther Party Library. Newsreel films, founded in the late 1960s, was
composed of decentralized film collectives that produced films
dealing with such issues as the Vietnam War, civil rights, anti-
imperialism and alternative culture.

The Young Lords Film / El Pueblo Se Levanta
(1971, 50:00 minutes, Newsreel, courtesy of Roz Payne Archives)
For over a year and a half, a Newsreel crew worked closely with the
Young Lords Party, a chapter of the Puerto Rican nationalist and
civil rights group. The film documents their many programs and plans
for Puerto Rican communities.


OCTOBER 28 – NOVEMBER 1: Engaged Global Counter Cultures
Five Days for Peace US PREMIERE
(1973, 37:00 minutes, Nils Vest, courtesy of Christiania, Copenhagen)
In Five Days for Peace, the members of SOLVOGNEN — the theater
collective from the squatted free town of Christiania, Copenhagen,
Denmark — dress as North American Treaty Organization (NATO) troops
and perform “military” operations in Copenhagen during the NATO Summit.

Indonesia: Art, Activism, and Rock ‘n’ Roll
(2002, 26:00 minutes, Charlie Hill Smith and Jamie Nicolal, in
Indonesian and English with English subtitles, courtesy of Marcom
Projects)
This documentary film follows Taring Padi, an art collective based
out of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Since 1998, the group has produced
posters, murals, street performances, puppets, poetry, music, and
published a newsletter. They describe themselves as an "independent
non-profit cultural community, which is based on the concept of
peoples' culture." They are committed to contributing to autonomous
culture, democracy, and social justice in Indonesia.

People's Park
(1969, 25:00 minutes, Newsreel, courtesy of Roz Payne Archives)
This film documents the struggle over People's Park in Berkeley,
California. In 1969, a vacant tract of University-owned land was
occupied by community residents, who began to convert it into a
"people's park" and a place for political organizing. Hundreds helped
to clear the land, plant flowers and trees, and some even set up
tents and started living there. Within a month, the University set
the site for demolition, and police surrounded the area with an eight-
foot tall fence. Approximately 3,000 protestors tried to reclaim the
park, the area was in chaos, and police shot at the crowds. Hundreds
were wounded by rioting or gunfire, one student was killed. Ronald
Reagan called in the National Guard, who occupied the city for
seventeen days.


NOVEMBER 4 – 8: Be the Media
Lanesville Overview 1
(1972, excerpt, Videofreex, courtesy of the artists and Video Data Bank)
A behind the scenes look at America’s first pirate television
station, Lanesville TV. Between 1972 and 1977, the Videofreex aired
over 250 television broadcasts from their hand-built studio.
Videofreex, founded in 1969, was one of the first video collectives
in the US. The collective made videos dealing with such issues as
civil rights, women’s rights, television, and alternative culture.

Be a DIVA
(1990, 28:00 minutes, DIVA TV, courtesy of Deep Dish TV)
This tape includes clips from a variety of DIVA (Damn Interfering
Video Activists) TV programs. DIVA TV was one of several video groups
that emerged from ACT UP (Aids Coalition To Unleash Power). The first
public access satellite network, Deep Dish TV was launched in 1986 by
Paper Tiger TV as a way to link independent producers, activists and
viewers who support movements for social change.

I the film
(2006, 84:00 minutes, Andres Ingoglia and Raphael Lyon, Spanish and
English, Courtesy of the artists)
This film is about Indymedia, a grassroots, independent media
network, and specifically focuses on Indymedia Argentina. The film
documents demonstrations after the collapse of the Argentine economy--
independent media played a major role in helping to organize the
protesters. The film also reveals the growth of social movements
transforming Argentine society, and functioning outside of government
political structures.

NOVEMBER 11 – 15 Student Solidarity
What the Fuck are These Red Squares?
(1970, 15:00 minutes, Kartemquin Film Collective, courtesy of
Kartemquin Films)
Documentary of students during a "revolutionary seminar" at the Art
Institute of Chicago during the 1970 national student strike that was
call in response to the invasion of Cambodia and the killing of
students at Kent and Jackson State Universities. The students raised
questions related to artists' roles in a capitalist economic system,
such as: "Is it possible not to be co-opted, as ‘radical’ as one’s
art may be? What are the connections between money and art in
America? Between the ‘New York Scene’ and the rest of the country?”
Kartemquin Films, best known for its award-winning documentary Hoop
Dreams (1994), was once known as Kartemquin Film Collective. The
collective made social and politically charged films about various
issues in Chicago including labor, gentrification, and student
protests. They also collaborated with members of Newsreel.

The Columbia University Divestment Struggle: Paper Tiger at Mandela
Hall, (1985, 28:00 minutes, Paper Tiger Television, courtesy of Paper
Tiger Television Collective)
In 1985 there was a nationwide campaign calling for corporations and
institutions to divest from South Africa as part of the anti-
apartheid movement. In solidarity with this campaign, student
protestors at Columbia University occupied a hall to demand that the
university sever its ties to businesses with investments in South
Africa. Paper Tiger Televison is a collectively run, alternative
media producer in New York City.

Standing with Palestine
(2004, 12:00 minutes, Paper Tiger Television, courtesy of Paper Tiger
Television Collective)
Standing with Palestine documents the grassroots movement in the
United States in support of the Palestinian people and against the
Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The video
includes interviews with groups such as the International Solidarity
Movement (ISM) and campus activists who are working on a campaign
(based on the successful student Divestment campaigns against
Apartheid South Africa in the 1980's) to force universities to
withdraw their ties to companies that support the Israeli Occupation.

Standing with the Students
(2007, 23:00 minutes, Sphinx in cooperation with Sin Fronteras Media
Collective and
Indymedia Amazonia, courtesy of the artist)
In 2005 students at the University of Buea in Cameroon organized to
demand more educational resources and basic human rights. The
Cameroon government violently attacked them, killing five. This video
was shot with a cell phone and the footage was snuck out of the country.


NOVEMBER 18 – 22: Globalize Resistance
A Very Big Train Called The Other Campaign / Un tren muy grande que
se llama: La Otra Campaña
(2006, 39:00 minutes,Caracoles Productions, Spanish with English
subtitles, courtesy of Chiapas Media Project/Promedios)
This video was produced by indigenous video makers from four of the
five Zapatista Caracoles in Chiapas, Mexico. It documents the 2006
planning and organizing of the Other Campaign. This was a campaign by
the Zapatista Army of National Liberation to build a self-governing
national infrastructure. For over a decade, the Chiapas Media Project
has partnered with indigenous and campesino (farm worker) communities
in Chiapas and Guerrero, Mexico to provide video production and
computer equipment and training.

Crowd Bites Wolf
(2001, 22:00 minutes, Guerillavision, NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0)
Part fictive-narrative, part protest-documentary, Crowd Bites Wolf
tells the story of the protest against the 2001 meeting of the
International Monetary Fund in Prague, Czech Republic.

Fourth World War
(2003, 76:00 minutes, Big Noise Films, courtesy of Big Noise Films)
This documentary takes viewers around the world--Mexico, Argentina,
South Africa, Palestine, Korea, Italy, Afghanistan, and Iraq--to
reveal people fighting against war and corporate domination. Big
Noise Films is a volunteer media collective that was first
established to document the Zapatista uprising in Chiapas, Mexico and
has continued making social movement media ever since.

DECEMBER 4-6: Videos About Land and Housing Struggles
Newe Segobia is Not for Sale: The Struggle for Western Shoshone Land
(1993, 29:00 minutes, Jesse Drew, courtesy of the artist and Video
Data Bank)
This video documents a confrontation between Western Shoshone
ranchers, sisters Carrie and Mary Dann, and the U.S. Federal Bureau
of Land Management (BLM) over disputed grazing lands. The Dann
sisters purchased a video camera to document the BLM’s misconduct.
Filmmaker Jesse Drew was given the unedited footage and created a
documentary that was distributed by Native American activists and
public access stations to gain support for the Western Shoshone
struggle. Though this incident involved only a few people, it is part
of the ongoing battle for Native North American land rights.

The Land Belongs to Those Who Work It/La tierra es de quien la
trabaja (2005, 15:00 minutes,Caracol V, Northern Zone, in Spanish and
Tzeltal with English subtitles, courtesy of Chiapas Media Project/
Promedios)
For over a decade, the Chiapas Media Project has partnered with
indigenous and campesino (farm worker) communities in Chiapas and
Guerrero, Mexico to provide video production and computer equipment
and training. This film from the Chiapas Media Project documents a
meeting between Zapatista authorities and Mexican government
officials to discuss the sale of land to a private eco-tourism
company without permission from the local community.

Uku Hamba 'Ze - To Walk Naked
(1995, 12:00 minutes, Jaqueline Maingard, Sheila Meintjes and Heather
Thompson, courtesy of Third World Newsreel)
After an exhausting fight to procure housing, a group of women in
Soweto, South Africa built a settlement of makeshift shacks. When
police tried to evict them with bulldozers and dogs, the women
defiantly stripped naked in a peaceful protest against the
destruction of their homes. This unconventional action gained massive
media attention and caught the attention of filmmakers who documented
the struggle in Uku Hamba ‘Ze / To Walk Naked.

IndyMedia Brazil Inside an MST Camp
(2002, 10:00 minutes, Indymedia Brazil, courtesy of Indymedia Brazil)
Brazil's Landless Workers Movement, Movimento dos Trabalhadores
Rurais Sem Terra (MST), is the largest social movement in Latin
America with an estimated 1.5 million members. This short documentary
represents an MST camp from the inside. Some 12,000 families, who
work together to oversee security and governance, occupy this
territory. The documentary features the workers’ abilities to self-
govern, provide food, child care, and housing for all, and to deal
with unwanted visits from government officials and mainstream media.
Indymedia is a global network of grassroots reporters and citizens
who cover issues and events important to diverse social movements.

Break and Enter
(1970, 42 min, Newsreel, courtesy of Third World Newsreel)
Break and Enter captures the efforts of several hundred Puerto Rican
and Dominican families to take over and live in abandoned buildings
in New York City. Third World Newsreel developed out of the
progressive social movements of the 1960s. Established in New York in
1967 as an activist filmmaking collective, it grew to have a network
of national chapters. These chapters would produce short 16mm films
that would counter the way events and issues were being presented in
the mainstream media. Today three Newsreel organizations remain:
Third World Newsreel in New York, California Newsreel in San
Francisco, and Vermont Newsreel Archives.
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2. Signs of Change Weekend of Screenings and Discussion co-sponsored
by 16beaver group, October 11-13, 2008, http://www.16beavergroup.org/
events/archives/002615.php

SATURDAY, October 11 at Exit Art, 475 10th Ave @ 36th Street
4 pm: Finally Got the News
(1970, 55:00 minutes, shown on 16 mm, League of Revolutionary Black
Workers, Stewart Bird, Rene Lichtman and Peter Gessner, courtesy of
the American Friends’ Service Committee)
A Newsreel crew heads to Detroit to document the League of
Revolutionary Black Workers. The League decides to take the means of
production into their own hands to represent themselves and their
struggle. The League of Revolutionary Black Workers came out of the
autonomous organizing of Black unions in Detroit-based automotive
plants which included DRUM (Dodge Revolutionary Union Movement) and
CRUM (Chrysler Revolutionary Union Movement). The League critiqued
the racist practices of the United Auto Workers and called for an
analysis of the role of the Black working class in revolutionary
struggles in the United States.

Plus: McStrike-Paris, 4:05 min, 2005, Victor Muh, Precarity DVD -
Magazine Made In collaboration with: P2Pfightsharing Crew
www.fightsharing.net, Greenpepper Project, Amsterdam
wwww.greenpeppermagazine.org, and Candida TV, Roma www.candidatv.tv
McDonald's workers go on strike in Paris, occupying their workplace
(a McDonald's restaurant) for six months.

7:30 pm: Narita: Peasants of the Second Fortress / Sanrizuka:
Dainitoride No Hitobito
(1971, 02:23:00 minutes, shown on 16 mm, Shinsuke Ogawa/Ogawa
Productions, Japanese with English subtitles, courtesy of the Athénée
Français Cultural Center)

Introduced by Barbara Hammer, filmmaker and Sabu Kohso, Japan-born
writer and activist

"In Japan, guerilla film activity reached high intensity during the
war (Vietnam).The use made of Japan as a conduit for Vietnam war
supplies generated strong anti-government feelings and many 'protest
films.'...It now saw such powerful films as the Sanrizuka series-
three feature length films. The heavy air traffic through Japan-
swollen by the war-hap prompted a 1966 decision to build a new
international airport for Tokyo.The area chosen, Sanrizuka, was
occupied by farmers who were determined to block seizures of their
lands. For four years, the film maker Shinsuke Ogawa documented their
struggle, which reached its climax in the third film, The Peasants of
the Second Fortress. Here we see resistance turning into a pitched
battle with riot police as farm women chain themselves to
impoverished stockades, and students join the struggle for anti-
government, anti-war motives. Ogawa, patiently recording the growth
of resistance...achieved an extraordinary social document, and one of
the most potent of protest films." - Erik Barnouw, Documentary: A
History of the Non-Fiction Film, (Oxford University Press, 1974)

Ogawa Productions was a Japanese filmmaking collective that was
founded in the 1960’s, It was directed by Ogawa Shinsuke. After
making films about the student movement, the collective moved to
Sanrizuka to cover the struggle against the building of the Narita
Airport. While there, they made eight films covering the struggle.

Screening co-sponsored by Asian/Pacific/American Institute and Tisch
Department of Photography & Imaging at NYU in conjunction with The
Uses of 1968: Legacies of Art and Activism Symposium and 1968: Then
and Now Exhibition.


SUNDAY October 12th AT 16 Beaver, 4th Floor
16 Beaver Group, 16 Beaver Street, Fourth Floor, New York, NY 10004,
212.480.2093
$5-$10 donation a day to cover bagels, coffee, and dinner

12-1:00 Coffee and Bagels
1:00- 1:30 Introduction and Welcome
Re-Framing Signs of Change: Focus on Documentary Media
The curators and organizers of the event will introduce the general
ideas and format for the weekend's screenings and discussions.

1:30- 4:00 Movement Media: Radical Form/Radical Politics
This session will examine some of the "greatest hits" of political
non-fiction film that are frequently invoked when talking about
social documentary or revolutionary cinema. Unlike a traditional
screening, the program will consist of a series of clips from and a
number of "revolutionary" film and videomakers. Each of which has
been chosen in order to raise a series of questions about the form
and function of media in relation to movements.The discussion will be
facilitated by the organizers.

4:30-7:30 Speaking Out Against War
Queen Mother Moore Speech at Green Haven Prison
(1973, 17:00 minutes, People’s Communication Network [co-founded by
Elaine Baly and Bill Stevens], courtesy of Chris Hill and Bob Devine)
Think Tank, a self-organized group of prisoners at Green Haven
Prison, coordinated a community day with outside activists. This tape
captures a powerful speech by one of the guest speakers: Queen Mother
Moore, a follower of Marcus Garvey, founder of the Universal Negro
Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA-ACL).
People's Communication Network, a community video group founded by
Bill Stevens, documented the event for cablecast in New York City.

Winter Soldier
(1972, 96:00 minutes, Winter Film Collective)
Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) organized the "Winter Soldier
Investigation" in the winter of 1971. Veterans from all over the
United States came together in Michigan to talk about their
experiences in Vietnam and to give eye-witness testimony of the war
crimes and atrocities that they witnessed and participated in. This
film captures the discussions before, during and after the official
"hearing" and displays the impact of the war's brutality on the
American GI's. A document of the Anti-War movement, the film
chronicles some of the difficulties that the organizers faced and the
film itself had a hard time finding an audience in the US at the time
of its production. In collaboration with the VVAW, a number of
filmmakers came together to document the "Winter Soldier
Investigation" and to make a film, the group called itself
Winterfilm. Collectively and anonymously, they filmed the proceedings
and then edited their footage into a powerful piece that was
conceived as an organizing tool. The film screened at a number of
film festivals in Europe as well.

Winter Soldier: Iraq and Afghanistan
(2008, 30:00 minutes, Big Noise Films, courtesy of Big Noise Films)
In 2008, Iraq Veterans Against the War (IVAW) restaged the Winter
Soldier hearings to testify to the world the injustices of the war.

Port Huron Project 4: Ceasar Chavez, Mark Tribe, 2008, 5 minutes
Part of a series of re-enactments of "New Left" speeches from the
late 60's and early 70's, this video documents a performance by
Ricardo Dominguez of an important speech made by Ceasar Chavez, the
leader of the United Farm Workers Union, in 1971. Organized by Mark
Tribe, this project seeks to call attention to the resonances between
past political action and protest speeches and contemporary political
situations. The re-enactment took place in July of 2008 at the
original site where Chavez delivered his speech in which he connected
the war in Vietnam to the struggles of farm workers and issues of
domestic violence in the United States.

8 pm Dinner and a Movie
Stronger Than Before
(1983, 27:00 minutes, the Boston Women’s Video Collective, courtesy
of the Boston Women’s Video Collective)
This film documents the militant actions and creative activities of
the Women’s Encampment for a Future of Peace and Justice in Seneca,
New York in 1983.
Although the Boston Women’s Video Collective was formed specifically
to document this encampment, they continued producing video projects
after it closed.

Fourth World War
(2003, 76:00 minutes, Big Noise Films, courtesy of Big Noise Films)
This documentary takes viewers around the world--Mexico, Argentina,
South Africa, Palestine, Korea, Italy, Afghanistan, and Iraq--to
reveal people fighting against war and corporate domination. Big
Noise Films is a volunteer media collective that was first
established to document the Zapatista uprising in Chiapas, Mexico and
has continued making social movement media ever since.


MONDAY October 13th at 16beaver
12-1:00 Coffee and Bagels
1:30 -4:00 Artists & Action: Documents of Creative Resistance
Happy Anniversary, San Francisco, March 20-21, 2003, 4:30 min, 2004,
Benj Gerdes
This video was shot part of a collective effort to videotape anti-
war direct action protests in San Francisco during the first two days
of the war on Iraq. Most of the video shot over this two day period
was initially used as documentation for legal rather than media/
documentary purposes. In this edit, every clip is the same length.
They are shown in the order they were recorded in order to challenge
more common activist editing techniques that imitate mainstream
television pacing, and thus ask something different of the audience.

What the Fuck are These Red Squares?
(1970, 15:00 minutes, Kartemquin Film Collective, courtesy of
Kartemquin Films)
Documentary of students during a "revolutionary seminar" at the Art
Institute of Chicago during the 1970 national student strike that was
call in response to the invasion of Cambodia and the killing of
students at Kent and Jackson State Universities. The students raised
questions related to artists' roles in a capitalist economic system,
such as: "Is it possible not to be co-opted, as ‘radical’ as one’s
art may be? What are the connections between money and art in
America? Between the ‘New York Scene’ and the rest of the country?”
Kartemquin Films, best known for its award-winning documentary Hoop
Dreams (1994), was once known as Kartemquin Film Collective. The
collective made social and politically charged films about various
issues in Chicago including labor, gentrification, and student
protests. They also collaborated with members of Newsreel.

Five Days for Peace US PREMIERE
(1973, 37:00 minutes, Nils Vest, courtesy of Christiania, Copenhagen)
In Five Days for Peace, the members of SOLVOGNEN — the theater
collective from the squatted free town of Christiania, Copenhagen,
Denmark — dress as North American Treaty Organization (NATO) troops
and perform “military” operations in Copenhagen during the NATO
Summit. FILMMAKER WILL BE PRESENT
More works TBA

4:30 - 6:30 Dispatches from The Counter-Globalization Movement
A Very Big Train Called The Other Campaign / Un tren muy grande que
se llama: La Otra Campaña
(2006, 39:00 minutes, Chiapas Media Project, Spanish with English
subtitles, courtesy of Chiapas Media Project/Promedios)
This video was produced by indigenous video makers from four of the
five Zapatista Caracoles in Chiapas, Mexico. It documents the 2006
planning and organizing of the Other Campaign. This was a campaign by
the Zapatista Army of National Liberation to build a self-governing
national infrastructure. For over a decade, the Chiapas Media Project
has partnered with indigenous and campesino (farm worker) communities
in Chiapas and Guerrero, Mexico to provide video production and
computer equipment and training.

Crowd Bites Wolf
(2001, 22:00 minutes, Guerillavision, NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0)
Part fictive-narrative, part protest-documentary, Crowd Bites Wolf
tells the story of the protest against the 2001 meeting of the
International Monetary Fund in Prague, Czech Republic.

What Would It Mean to Win? US PREMIERE
(2008, 40:00 minutes, German and English, Zanny Begg and Oliver
Ressler, courtesy of
the artists)
This film — shot at the G8 Summit protests in Heiligendamm, Germany
in June 2007 — asks activists in the counter-globalization movement
to answer the question: “What would it mean to win?” Featuring
interviews with protestors and with John Holloway, whose 2002 book
Change the World Without Taking Power was influential to the movement.

7:30 Dinner and One More Movie
Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance
(1993, 01:59:00 minutes, Alanis Obomsawin, courtesy of Bullfrog Films)
This documentary covers the two and half month armed stand-off
between members of the Mohawk Nation, the Québec police, and the
Canadian army. The Mohawks are fighting to keep their land as a
commons against the development interests of a private golf course.


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3. Installed Videos - looping the duration of the show

(monitor 1)
Gimme an Occupation with that McStrike
(2005, 04:05 minutes, Victor Muh, Precarity DV/–Magazine, made in
collaboration with: P2Pfightsharing Crew; Greenpepper Project,
Amsterdam;
and Candida TV, Rome)
McDonald's workers go on strike in Paris, occupying their workplace (a
McDonald's restaurant) for six months.

Richmond Strike
(1969, Newsreel, courtesy of Roz Payne Archives)
In January l969, local police in Northern California attacked
striking oil
workers and their families, killing one person and injuring many others.
Student protestors from San Francisco State University were asked to
join
the struggle, uniting workers and students against a common foe. This
film includes interviews with employees on strike and against Shell
Oil in
Martinez and Richmond, California.

(monitor 2)
Repression
(13:33 minutes, Newsreel, courtesy of Roz Payne Archives)
A documentary about the Los Angeles Black Panther Party with music by
Elaine Brown.

Queen Mother Moore Speech at Green Haven Prison
(1973, 17:00 minutes, People’s Communication Network [co-founded by
Elaine Baly and Bill Stevens], courtesy of Chris Hill and Bob Devine)
Think Tank, a self-organized group of prisoners at Green Haven
Prison, coordinated a community day with outside activists. This tape
captures a powerful speech by one of the guest speakers: Queen Mother
Moore, a follower of Marcus Garvey, founder of the Universal Negro
Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA-ACL).
People's Communication Network, a community video group founded by
Bill Stevens, documented the event for cablecast in New York City.

(monitor 3)
Up Against the Wall Ms. America
(1968, 08:00 minutes, Newsreel, courtesy of Roz Payne Archives)
This film documents a creative Women’s Liberation protest outside the
1968 Miss America Pageant in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Women’s Lib Demonstration I
(1970, 05:00 minute excerpt, Videofreex, courtesy of Video Data Bank
and the VideoFreex Partnership)
Documentation of the 1970 Women's Liberation march in New York City,
part of the "national women's strike for equality" called to
commemorate the 50th anniversary of women's suffrage. Demonstrators
include members of Women’s Strike for Peace. Videofreex was an early
video collective, which existed from 1969-1977. During that time, the
collective documented the counterculture and social movements,
experimented with new video technology, ran a pirate television
station, and produced over 1,500 tapes.

Purple Dinosaur Action Segment
(1973, 10:00 minutes, Barbara Jabaily, Tracy Fitz and Lesbians
Organized for Video Experience (L.O.V.E), courtesy of the Lesbian
Herstory Educational Foundation, Inc.)
In this film members of the Lesbian Feminist Liberation (LFL) create
a large, purple, papier-mâché dinosaur and wheel it to the Museum of
Natural History in New York to protest the patriarchal values and
histories presented by the museum. They are accompanied by the
Victoria Woodhall Marching Band, a lesbian marching band that
performed at protests and senior centers. L.O.V.E. documented many of
the activities organized by LFL, including the New York City Lesbian
Olympics and this action at the Museum of Natural History.

(monitor 4)
South Africa: Freedom Rising
(1978, 20:00 minutes, audio slideshow, ITT Boycott and the Dayton
Community Media Workshop, courtesy of the American Friends’ Service
Committee)
This slide show was produced to educate Americans on the injustice of
the apartheid system in South Africa and the presence of US
corporations in that country. It serves to illustrate one of the many
ways grassroots movements used technology that was accessible to them
to get the message out. The Dayton Community Media Workshop described
itself as “a collective of artists working within the New American
Movement.”

(monitor 5)
Indonesia: Art, Activism, and Rock ‘n’ Roll
(2002, 26:00 minutes, Charlie Hill Smith and Jamie Nicolal, in
Indonesian and English with English subtitles, courtesy of Marcom
Projects)
This documentary film follows Taring Padi, an art collective based
out of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Since 1998, the group has produced
posters, murals, street performances, puppets, poetry, and music and
has published a newsletter. They describe themselves as an
"independent non-profit cultural community, which is based on the
concept of peoples' culture." They are committed to contributing to
autonomous culture, democracy, and social justice in Indonesia.

(monitor 6)
It Can Be Done
(1974, 32:00 minutes, Shirley Jensen and Barbara Bejna with the
Chicago Women’s Graphic Collective, courtesy of Kartemquin Films and
Shirley Jensen)
This documentary follows the Chicago Women’s Liberation Print Shop as
it makes a poster for United Farm Workers. These artists, women, and
activists talk about their collective process and the political
relevance of this project within the women’s movement and other
political campaigns.

(monitor 7)
TXTmob - Nw Mor Thn Evr
(2004, the Institute for Applied Autonomy, courtesy of the Institute
for Applied Autonomy)
Documentation of creative uses of a text messaging service devised to
assist protest communications. The Institute for Applied Autonomy
(IAA) is an arts and engineering collective founded in 1998 devoted
to developing “technologies which extend the autonomy of human
activists.”

(monitor 8)
Reclaim the Streets
(1996, 07:00 minutes, Undercurrents, courtesy of Undercurrents)
Undercurrents is an alternative news organization that has documented
social movements in the United Kingdom since 1994. This film
documents a Reclaim the Streets Party-Protest.

Sound Demo
(03:11 minutes, Japanese Activism DVD, courtesy of ill commonz)
A sound demo from Reclaim the Streets, Japan.

Transistor Connected Drum Collective
(06:49 minutes, illcommonz, courtesy illcommonz)
Japanese experimental musicians reclaim the streets of Tokyo to
protest the war in Iraq.

(projected)
Iraq Veterans Against the War: Operation First Casualty
(2008, 5 minutes, Elizabeth Press for Democracy Now)
Iraq Veterans Against the War (IVAW) is a national organization
formed in
2004 by veterans of the Iraq War. Operation First Casualty (OFC) is a
street
theater project that members of the organization perform dressed in
military
uniforms. OFC stages performances that are reenactments of combat
patrols on
the streets of US cities, as they would happen in Iraq, to bring the
realities of war home. In this document they perform OFC outside the
Democratic National Convention in Denver 2008.


http://www.exitart.org/site/pub/exhibition_programs/signs_of_change/
index.html#about
Exit Art is located at 475 Tenth Avenue, corner of 36th Street in
New York City

and
Miller Gallery, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA
Jan. 23–March 8, 2009
Jan. 23, 6-8pm: Reception

End of Capitalism


The argument that the country faced a crisis so profound that unless they approved the government's plans, American capitalism would grind to a halt as funds flowing between the banks began to dry up. ...BBC

Shape those minds

Films distribution in US

In 2004 we developed a website -
www.forwardintime.com - to market our 5 PBS documentaries to colleges,
libraries and nursing/medical schools in the US. Encouraged by our success
in selling our docs to hundreds of schools, we began to add programs from
other producers in the US and Europe. We now have more than 150 titles in
our Documentary & Film Library, including 30+ programs from the UK and
other EU producers.

To date we have sold DVDs to more than 800 schools and libraries in the
US, Canada and now Australia. What sets us apart from more traditional
documentary distributors is:
(1) We offer our producers a 40% royalty
which is double what the vast majority of distributors offer.
(2) We do not force producers to sign a 2-3 year exclusive agreement. We
are only interested in selling programs to specific markets and allow
producers to opt out in 45 days if they are unhappy with the our marketing
efforts.
(3) Producers have the option to supply the DVDs for sale or to have us
handle the duplication and printing for them.

We have just recently developed an new site -- www.forwardintime.com/k-12
-- for sales to public libraries, public school libraries and approved
non-government agencies at reduced prices.

If any producers have documentaries or independent films that will help
promote discussion in college classrooms, they can check out the related
categories on our web site and send us a DVD screener to review. As I
personally review all submissions, it usually takes me about 2 weeks to
make a decision.

Thank you.


Stanley Stern
Parallel Lines
#301 5507 Nesconset Highway
Mount Sinai NY 11766
631-676-1070
info@forwardintime.com

Monday, September 29, 2008

Alabama 3


Recorded Alabama 3 Acoustic and Unplugged last night in a 4 camera mix in Cwmaman, South Wales Valley. Great music.

A3 are a four-piece outfit consisting of Larry Love (vocals), Devlin Love (vocals), Rock Freebase (guitar), and Harpo Strangelove (harmonica),

With this line up they bring a whole new dimension to the songs made famous by Alabama 3. This isn’t acid house music, this is country/gospel/delta blues, but played with a rhythm you’ve still got to dance to.
'Blending techno, acid house and country, Alabama 3 has scored big across the Big Pond.
Their music has appeared in "The Sopranos" as the theme song and in the film "Gone in 60 Seconds."

They showed why at the concert.
With only a guitar, a harmonica and two voices, Alabama 3 captivated the audience with an intricate weave of harmonies, melodies and lyrics, which ranged from love and cheating to murder and social injustice.
Alabama 3 founder Larry Love's raspy, intense vocals were a perfect balance to the sweet yet fiery twang from Zoe Devlin.


http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/music/features/on-tour-with-alabama-3-510799.html

Hide your recordings

DV500 digital hidden video
http://www.dogcamsport.co.uk/covert-cameras.htm

Friday, September 26, 2008

Reel News


2007 REEL NEWS.
Reel News is an activist video collective, set up to publicise and share information on inspirational campaigns and struggles - not just in this country, but across the world. Initially we are doing this through producing a monthly newsreel, made up of a number of videos short enough to use in union and campaign meetings.

The need to learn from each other seems increasingly urgent. The disastrous wars in Iraq and Afghanistan could soon be added to by an attack on Iran, while the rights of the Palestinian people are ignored.

http://reelnews.co.uk/

Sell your film

The Mini-MeetMarket is a unique opportunity for new and emerging
documentary filmmakers to meet industry mentors in an informal setting at
the Sheffield DocFest.

The Mini-MeetMarket is a project pitching and steering session, running
during the morning of Friday 7th November 2008. The session is open to
Sheffield DocFest delegates and DFG Newcomer's Day passholders, who will
have the opportunity to meet industry movers and shakers in an intimate
roundtable environment.

The aim is simple: to enable you to get feedback on your documentary idea,
no matter how undeveloped it is at this stage. You'll get a response on how
you pitched it as well as pointers on how it needs developing, where to go
next, and how to improve your chances of getting funding.

Filmmakers are invited to submit a short proposal no more than 250 words
in length together with a brief biography and full contact details to
kerry@dfgdocs.com by 5pm on Monday 13th October 2008. The application must
fit on one side of A4. We welcome interactive and cross-platform ideas.

Up to 30 projects will be selected to take part in this event, and the
successful projects will be notified in the week beginning 20th October.

Please note: to be eligible for this event, you must be planning to attend
the Sheffield DocFest either as a delegate or as a DFG Newcomer's Day
passholder. You must also be available to attend meetings on the morning
of Friday 7th November 2008.

The Mini-MeetMarket is part of the DFG Newcomers Day, taking place on
Thursday 6th November 2008. For more details see: http://sheffdocfest.com
or http://www.dfgdocs.com/Events/1557.aspx

Glasgow Film Festival seeks films

A call for submissions from our friends at the Glasgow Film Festival - the
deadline is 31 October 2008...

The 5th Glasgow Film Festival will run from February 12-22nd 2009 in
venues throughout the city. The Festival is the fastest-growing film event
in Britain, attracting audiences of over 20,000 in 2008 when it played host
to a bumper array of UK premieres including Lars And The Real Girl,
Cassandra's Dream, The Cottage, The Bank Job, Honeydripper and The
Spiderwick Chronicles.

The Festival has now started the submission process for 2009 and welcomes
features, shorts and work in all genres. The Festival is committed to
supporting Scottish talent and providing audiences with the opportunity to
see the best of world cinema. Several films selected through the submission
process played to enthusiastic crowds at Glasgow including the
documentaries A Life In The Death Of Joe Meek, Body Of War and An Unlikely
Weapon by Susan Morgan Cooper. The Festival was also proud to screen Joanna
Hogg's Unrelated and Dominic Lees thriller Outlanders which were both
submitted to the Festival and have both subsequently secured UK theatrical
distribution.

" Last year was the first time we opened the Festival to submissions and
we were very pleasantly surprised by the quantity and also the quality of
the films that were offered to us, " states Festival co-director Allan
Hunter.
" The Festival team is eagerly looking forward to viewing and discussing
the films that are submitted this year. Every film is given a fair chance.
The features and shorts shown last year testify to the integrity of the
process and the genuine opportunities open to filmmakers who want to
submit their films to Glasgow. "

Deadline for submissions is the 31 October 2008. Booking forms and all
information can be found online at http://www.glasgowfilmfestival.org.uk

13year old skateboarders handcuffed by US Police

Skateboarders attacked by US Police



Land of the free...home of the B..

Arrests for protesting



4 animal rights activists get arrested. First for section 5 (for using a megaphone!) and then the rest for obstruction. All charges were dropped against all arrested.

Thursday, September 25, 2008

Project Hostile

Last year, New Scientist revealed that the US Department of Homeland Security is developing a system designed to detect "hostile thoughts" in people walking through border posts, airports and public places. The DHS says recent tests prove it works.

Project Hostile Intent as it was called aimed to help security staff choose who to pull over for a gently probing interview - or more.

Commentators slated the idea that sensors could spot people up to no good from their pulse rate, breathing, skin temperature, or fleeting facial expressions. One likened it to the "pre-crime" units that predict criminal behaviour in the movie Minority Report.

However, last week, the DHS science unit gave an update on the project, now dubbed the less-hostile-sounding Future Attribute Screening Technologies (FAST) programme. And, if DHS claims are to be believed, the research appears to be getting somewhere.

At an equestrian centre in Maryland, 140 paid volunteers walked through a pair of trailers kitted out with a battery of FAST sensors, including cameras, infrared heat sensors and an eyesafe laser radar, called a Bio-Lidar, that measures pulse and breathing rate from a distance.

Some subjects were told to act shifty, be evasive, deceptive and hostile. And many were detected. "We're still very early on in this research, but it is looking very promising," says DHS science spokesman John Verrico. "We are running at about 78% accuracy on mal-intent detection, and 80% on deception."

That sounds incredibly high at such an early stage in the research - but only tests on vast quantities of real people, rather than eager volunteers, will present any real test.

Questions remain, however, as to how secure the system is. The machines could reveal health conditions like heart murmurs and breathing problems as well as stress levels - which would be an invasion of privacy.

But Verrico says FAST has been through stringent privacy controls (pdf) and that the data is never matched to a name. It is only used to make decisions about whether to question someone, and then discarded.

The trial technology was installed in a trailer because it is planned to be easily transportable, so that FAST trucks can appear at any sports or music event as required. They look set to become as regular a sight at such events as mobile toilets and catering trucks.

But is going to make a real difference? Or will bad guys learn to play the system and render it another piece of what expert Bruce Schneier dubs "security theatre".
read more

Make wealth history

Channel 4 dosh

Channel 4 are offering 1000 bursaries to
complete short documentaries that need completion, go to:
http://www.channel4.com/culture/microsites/F/fourdocs/bursaries/index.html
for more information - there are a few conditions for application, but you
should be fine. Good luck! I am going to apply too

Tuesday, September 23, 2008

On the Push showing in Plymouth

On the Push – A Surfer’s Guide to Climate Change (75 min documentary)

NEWS RELEASE-UK ECO-SURF MOVIE PUSHES FOR CHANGE

Award-winning British Filmmaker Anne Gallagher will be joined by the surfing community at the English Premier of her latest film ‘On the Push’ at the Jill Craigie Cinema, University of Plymouth this coming Friday, 26th September 2008.
Funded by the Film Agency for Wales, ‘On the Push’ is produced by Undercurrents Productions and tells the story of Anne, an ordinary surfer girl from Wales, who becomes an eco-activist. The film follow Anne's journey from Porthcawl to Cornwall, Spain and Switzerland as she learns about the serious threat of climate change- and how a surfer can help protect the marine environment.
Filmed on the Welsh coast, Cornwall and Spain, the eco-surf film highlights the hundreds of bathing beaches that have been contaminated with increased levels of sewage as the wet summer increases pressure on water treatment systems and forces millions of extra litres of toxic waste to be pumped into the sea.
The aim of Anne and her team was to raise the profile of the problems faced by surfers in Wales due to increased water pollution following summer floods. She said: “Increased rainfall has a massive impact on sewage systems. This year, Environment Agency tests have identified an increase in coliform bacteria-which are abundant in human and animal faeces- at 310 testing sites. This bacteria leaves surfers exposed to gastroenteritis and vomiting. “

In On the Push Chris Hines, founder of Surfers Against Sewage and recent MBE, agrees that climate change is an issue that everyone should be engaging with. “Climate change is a huge challenge for us all, but we’re an incredibly resourceful species. We can solve it, we just need to get together and do it.”

Despite issues with potential water pollution, On the Push is still encouraging surfers to enjoy local beaches. At a time when environmentalists are discouraging flying and the credit crunch squeezes family budgets, more people are looking to holiday in the UK and beach quality is paramount.


Made by award-winning activist filmmakers Undercurrents, and funded by Artists Project Earth and The Wales Film Agency, On the Push will have its first English screening at the University Plymouth before going on to Cornwall in October. For details of these events and information of how to get involved and set up your own surf cinema- visit www.onthepush.org.

ENDS

Note for editors:
On the Push (running time 70 mins) director Helen iles, presenter Anne Gallagher, produced by Undercurrents Productions, Swansea.

Pics, interviews with Director and Presenter ring Helen iles 07970 161886 or Anne Gallagher 07886683403.

Environmental movies to see

A great list of films to see to get informed and inspired

http://www.grinningplanet.com/6001/environmental-movies.htm

Everythings cool- new climate change film



A group of self-appointed global warming messengers are on a life-or-death quest to help the public understand the urgency of the problem and create the 'political will' necessary to push for a new energy economy.

Everything's Cool features a renowned cast of scientists, journalists and activists including Step It Up's Bill McKibben, Pulitzer Prize winner Ross Gelbspan, The Weather Channel's Dr. Heidi Cullen and White House Whistle-Blower Rick Piltz.

http://everythingscool.org/

Aviation and climate Change 3

Stripper plane v Parliament

Aviation and climate Change 2

Pearly Queen plane v Parliament

Aviation and climate Change

Rock plane v Parliament

Monday, September 22, 2008


Silvio Berlusconi and his organization have understood very good that if you control the media, you can act undisturbed and they are not only interested in the Italian media…
One of the biggest media concerns in the world, Endemol , was taken over last year by Mediaset owned by the Italian dictator himself.
Now Berlusconi is interested in Brtish television (ITV) ..read more



.read more

Films wanted

Short films of any style and genre: drama, experimental, videoart,
documentaries, music clips, animation, etc. below 20 minutes for
Rotoreliefs, a free networking screenings every month at Vibe (Brick Lane)
and Roxy (London Bridge) in London.

To submit your work for the selection process please go to:
www.rotoreliefs.com => 'Contact' and download the Submission Form.

Rotoreliefs is a free networking platform oriented to emerging and
upcoming talents in the independent art and film industries. Through
regular events it renders a different concept of short films and video-art
screenings that focuses on providing a serious and accessible alternative
to an increasing demand for valid networking events in the industry.

At our events the artists showcasing their works, representatives of
companies and professionals collaborating with us, they all have a chance
to talk to the audience and share their experiences behind the scenes,
their view of the industry, upcoming projects, needs, passions...
Altogether Rotoreliefs is a live experience of the industrys heart and
soul in a relaxed and professional environment.

Friday, September 19, 2008

Battle in Seattle

http://battleinseattlemovie.com/

It is interesting when protest culture makes it to the cinema screen in drama form. A new film comes out soon about how activists shut down the WTO in Seattle back in 1999. Made by a fellow Irish man so I look forward to it.

Heres the blurb from the website-
It’s November 1999, and five days are about to rock the world as tens of thousands of demonstrators take to the streets of Seattle in protest of the World Trade Organization’s Ministerial Meeting. Among them are Django (Andre Benjamin), Sam (Jennifer Carpenter), Lou (Michelle Rodriguez) and Jay (Martin Henderson). Each has a unique story, but they’re united in a common desire to be heard and to make a difference in the world. For these four protesters, this is very personal and the stakes are higher than mere politics.

A peaceful demonstration to stop the WTO talks quickly escalates into a full-scale riot, and soon a State of Emergency is declared by the Mayor of Seattle. The streets are mayhem, and the WTO is paralyzed. Caught in the crossfire of civil liberties and keeping the peace are Seattle residents, including its beleaguered mayor (Ray Liotta), a riot cop on the streets (Woody Harrelson) and his pregnant wife (Charlize Theron). The choices they all make will change their lives forever.

Writer/Director Stuart Townsend brings together this talented ensemble to intertwine different points of view – from protesters and police to delegates and doctors -- each of whom intentionally or accidentally find themselves on the streets of Seattle in those last days of the millennium. Townsend seamlessly merges footage of the real event with his fictional narrative. Ultimately, Battle in Seattle illustrates that even against incredible odds, ordinary people can change the world.

Film Maker podcasts

The podcasts include comment from Stuart Cosgrove, Channel 4's Director of Nations and Regions, who discusses the place of regional independents in the UK production market; Nick Francis, Co-Director of "Black Gold", who gives insight into the film's funding structure; Emily Renshaw-Smith,Director of viewer created content at Current TV, who speaks about distribution opportunities; and Shooting People's James Mullighan, who
offers practical advice on how new talent can get their films made and seen.
CLICK HERE

Bicycle Film Festival London

Re~Cycle, the charity that ships used bicycles to Africa is again the chosen charity of the Bicycle Film Festival's London event (17 around the world).


- Volunteers needed to help Re~Cycle run the valet bicycle parking and sell raffle tickets- Buy some raffle tickets for a great bike- Come and see some great films (from £7.50)

WHEN: Wednesday 1st October to Saturday 4th
WHERE: The Barbican Cinema, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS.
More info:
http://bicyclefilmfestival.com/2008_site/london

HELP NEEDED PLEASE:
* People to help run the valet bicycle parking
* People to sell raffle tickets for posh bike
* If you can get some friends to fill a time slot
with you (say 3 or 4 people), it would be easier
to organise (thanks!)
* Individuals are VERY welcome!
* Cycle Surgery will be organising + bringing all
the equipment + supplying t-shirts to wear


Times + days (volunteer slots from Rita, below):
Wed Oct 1 - 8PM-12AM
Thurs Oct 2 - 6:30PM- 11PM
Fri Oct 3 - 6:15- 12AM
Sat Oct 4 - 1:45PM- 12AM

There is also Bicycle Polo on Sunday and an after party.


VOLUNTEERS GET:
- Free tickets to films
- A generous 20% discount at Cycle Surgery shops,
everything in store (bikes, clothing &
accessories etc etc)

I'm Very Grateful that the splendid Rita is coordinating the volunteers, so please contact her directly:Rita Solanke


RAFFLE - will be online in the next couple of days:
Prize bike it's a £799 worth of bike, a Wilier
Pista singlespeed commuting/courier/track bike.
Winner can choose the size
http://www.cyclesurgery.com/1026569/Wilier-Pista.html

£2 for 1 ticket
£5 for 3 tickets
£10 for 7 tickets
£20 for 15 tickets

PRESS:
laura@bicyclefilmfestival.com

My video is ITVs Clip of the Week



My video report of the coal protest in Cardiff is Clip of the week!

Thursday, September 18, 2008

Chomsky

Surfers Chain Record Attempt

Journalist beaten and arrested


The camera exploded in my face and I was trying to figure out exactly what happened, when a group of the black-clad cops ran at me from all directions, trapping me against the wall. Using their sticks, they pushed me to the ground where, with their boots, they pinned me. One cop took his stick and poked me repeatedly in the genitals. Another punched me in the face. The entire time I was yelling “Press! Press! Press!” but it didn’t stop them. They flipped me over, and handcuffed me behind my back so tight that my hands were numb in minutes...read more

Data harvesting- who gathers info on you?

In a look at the increasing problem of identity theft, Rebecca Wilcox investigates how marketeers have been relentlessly tracking and profiling her, then buying and selling her personal information. Learn about Facebook, Tescos, Sky and others

But Becca is determined to turn the tables on this multi-billion pound marketing industry and sets out to use their tactics against them. When she discovers the perils of her information slipping into the wrong hands, she develops a plan to protect us all and takes it to the top level of government.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00ddwmf/

Film maker gets arrested



Getting arrested while filming..A short clip from a documentary feature called Little Criminals (64 mins). A year in the lives of a group of junkie shoplifters in Glasgow, Scotland (1999-2000). Some sections were broadcast in Detox or Die (BBC One Life, 2004). BAFTA Scotland nomination 2002. Celtic Film & TV Festival 2002.

Black & Asian short film festival

CALLING FOR FILM ENTRIES
Extended Dead Line -October 17th 2008

Now in its sixth year - *Buffalo-san a Black & Asian short film festival,
is happening in November 2008 at the Ritzy cinema in South London.
Featuring innovative and exciting short films from new and established
film makers from all over the country and abroad. Including Q&A with film
makers, great prizes for best film (chosen by the audience) plus
showcasing live performance from poets and musicians.

The festival will be attended by development executives from C4 BBC
Drama The UK Film Council Miramax -Working title and other film media
professionals.

The ethos of the *Buffalo-san film festival is to promote and celebrate
innovative filmmakers from the Black & Asian Diaspora, and specifically
encourage new audiences to explore and be entertained by the filmmakers
visions.

Black&Asain in this context, means, any person working in or on your film,
in any capacity, from the Black or Asian Diaspora then your film qualifies
for entry
There is no submission fee.

Please send a DVD copy of your film, any genre (up to 40 minutes in
duration) completed after 2005, it must include a short synopsis, two
production stills, and all contact details to:

Festival Director
*Buffalo-san
Black & Asian Short Film Festival
2 Grandison Road
Clapham Common
London
SW11 6LW
Uk

For more information email: wadebuffalo@yahoo.co.uk

Wednesday, September 17, 2008

WELSH ECO-SURF MOVIE CAMPAIGNS FOR CHANGE

Press release

Award-winning Welsh Filmmaker Helen Iles will be joined by the surfing
community at the premier of her latest film ‘On the Push’ at Porthcawl’s
SurfCult Festival this coming Sunday, 21st September 2008.

Funded by the Film Agency for Wales, ‘On the Push’ is produced by
Swansea-based Undercurrents Productions and tells the story of Anne, an
ordinary surfer girl from Wales, who becomes an eco-activist. The film
follow Anne's journey from Porthcawl to Cornwall, Spain and Switzerland as
she learns about the serious threat of climate change- and how a surfer
can help protect the marine environment.

Filmed on the Welsh coast, Cornwall and Spain, the eco-surf film
highlights the hundreds of bathing beaches that have been contaminated
with increased levels of sewage as the wet summer increases pressure on
water treatment systems and forces millions of extra litres of toxic waste
to be pumped into the sea.

The aim of Director Helen Iles and her team was to raise the profile of the
problems faced by surfers in Wales due to increased water pollution
following summer floods. She said: “Increased rainfall has a massive
impact on sewage systems. This year, Environment Agency tests have
identified an increase in coliform bacteria-which are abundant in human
and animal faeces- at 310 testing sites. This bacteria leaves surfers
exposed to gastroenteritis and vomiting. “

In ‘On the Push’ Chris Hines, founder of Surfers Against Sewage and recent
MBE, agrees that climate change is an issue that everyone should be
engaging with: “Climate change is a huge challenge for us all, but we’re
an incredibly resourceful species. We can solve it, we just need to get
together and do it.”

“With stunning surf photography, funky music and beautiful locations, On
the Push offers an approach to global warming which is enjoyable and
accessible, but also inspiring,” added Pauline Burt, Chief Executive of
the Film Agency for Wales.

Supported by Artists Project Earth, ‘On the Push’ will launch at Porthcawl
Pavilion on September 21st as part of the SurfCult Festival. The film will
be at the Mariners Pub, Nolton Haven, Pembrokeshire on 18th October,
Aberystwyth Arts Centre Cinema on 26th October and at the Waterfront
Museum in Swansea on 23rd November as part of the BeyondTV Festival. For
tickets and further information call Undercurrents on 01792 455900 or
visit www.onthepush.org.


ENDS

Notes to Editors:

Film Agency for Wales
Established in July 2006, the Film Agency for Wales is the sole Agency for
film in Wales, with a remit to ensure that the economic, cultural and
educational aspects of film are effectively represented in Wales, the UK
and the world. As a strategic agency, the Film Agency aims to facilitate
the emergence of a viable and sustainable Welsh film industry and to
promote a vibrant and dynamic film culture.

The Film Agency for Wales is funded by the Arts Council of Wales, the UK
Film Council and the Welsh Assembly Government, via Creative Business
Wales, the latter of which was set up to support, encourage and increase
the range and number of films being produced in Wales and to foster the
abundance of creative talent in Wales.

The Agency's priority is to identify and nurture Welsh filmmaking talent –
particularly writers, directors, writer-directors and producers – by
supporting and encouraging the development of their work, accomplishments
and ambitions. We support a broad policy on film education to complement
our central priority of creating and maintaining a dynamic film culture
across Wales. We aim to enhance film literacy for all and stimulate an
appetite for specialised, cultural and non-mainstream films.

Further information is available at www.filmagencywales.com and www.onthepush.org

Monday, September 15, 2008

Corporate Man



More here

Coal activists meeting October 11


Leave it in the Ground National Meeting Manchester 11th / 12th October
Posted July 30, 2008

The Meeting will be held at the Yard Theatre, 41 Old Birley Street, Hulme, Manchester M15 5RF, as an opportunity to meet others from across the UK fighting coal developments, share experiences and skills and, hopefully have some fun! Additionally, we hope to discuss:

- how the network will operate in the future

- strategy

- what we have and what we need

- how we communicate, internally and externally

- ideas for action

Info[at]leaveitintheground.org.uk

Tehran callling for your political films

PRESS TV is a Tehran-based English satellite news network that has started broadcasting internationally on eleven different broadcast satellites on a 24-hour basis in 2007.

The network plans to concentrate on important, influential and global issues and affairs that do not receive adequate coverage by mainstream media throughout the world and offer alternative viewpoints.

The critique of the monopolistic and manipulative approach of a number of powerful countries towards other nations, despite the existence of numerous problems in their own societies; concern over world peace because of interference by these hegemonic countries in the internal affairs of other states; and also concentration on issues of the Muslim World are but a few among many points of emphasis for PRESS TV.

PRESS TV broadcasts 365 hours of documentary programs annually of which half are produced by the network itself and half acquired through other sources.

PRESS TV's documentaries, pro­duced in all continents and many countries, try to reveal the truth with a different outlook to people around the world. Through these documentaries PRESS TV shows a different point of view on current affairs from the mainstream media.

PRESS TV is also interested in acquiring documentary programs. Since PRESS TV's main focus is on major issues occurring in the four corners of the world, current affairs of critical and analytic value that are also challenging for the viewers are high on the agenda of the network. The Documentary Acquisition Department calls on all film production and distributing companies to let us know if they have any programs of this kind.

Naturally, we at the Documentary Programs Department of the network would like to be in contact with directors, producers, distributors of documentary films and also program buyers all over the world.

PRESS TV Documentary Programs
6 East 2nd St.
24-Metri Blvd., Sa'adatabad
Tehran 1997766411
I.R.Iran
Tel: +98 21 23011 211
Fax: +98 21 23011 219

The world's 50 best walks

The world's 50 best walks
The world’s best treks, from a grade-one pub stroll right up to a grade-five yeti hunt

Here is one..
With the imminent return of The Prisoner to our television screens, Portmeirion will soon be back in the limelight. It’s the supreme monument to British eccentricity, a high-camp Italianate village assembled in the 1920s using abandoned monuments and bits of scrap statuary, painted in zany colours and tattooed onto a remote headland overlooking Cardigan Bay. A walk there is relentlessly enchanting. You can tunnel through 70 acres of exotic clifftop gardens to find bricolage temples and lighthouses, then blink out across the expanse of Black Rock Sands. Open daily; £7, children £3.50; www.portmeirion-village.com
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/travel/holiday_type/active/article4740590.ece

Coal protsters cleared

Coal Protests wanted on video


Have you filmed Coal protest?
We are Undercurrents, an alternative media group, and we are producing a campaign video for coal activists. We need video of protests, direct actions, protest camps etc against coal.

If you know of anyone who may have recorded video images, please put them in touch with us. (details below) or email paulo@undercurrents.org

Cheers
Paul

Undercurrents
Old exchange
Pier Street
Swansea SA1 1RU
UK
+44(0)1792 455900
+44 (0)7973 298359

The News you don't see on the News!
http://www.undercurrents.org

Living without a car


A good blog about Decombustion-living without a car (and related musings)
read more

Protest is not enough


Protest is not enough by "Joost van Steenis"
*The elite hardly listens*
The elite reigned in the past and is in the present still on top. That has
to change.

"The G8 meeting is over.
"Protests withered away.
"The situation in the world did not improve.
"Next year another G8 meeting.
"Next year another protest.
"Next year again nothing will change.
*"Something different has to happen."

* *

Protesters are only asking (begging?) leaders to change decisions. But all
protests are absorbed by society. Leaders continue to take decisions in
agreement with the elitist paradigm, they just go on with what they are
doing. All protests remain within the framework set by the paradigm that the
eliteworld must be preserved and extended and that Money, Power and
Elitepersons must come first. Though some money maybe directed towards the
massworld, neither power relations, the mind of leaders or the reasons why
they take certain decisions change.

*Real change is not possible when power relations don't change.
Power relations don't change when the minds of people with power do not
change.*

Actions must be part of the clash between the old elitist paradigm and the
new human paradigm.People must stand central, not power, not money. The new paradigm demands that all people have equal status. Now decisions are in the first place
taken by looking at the interest of a small part of the population, the
elite.

*There have been many actions of masspeople but powerful leaders always
remained in their place* and new decisions differed not much from attacked
decisions. Activists sometimes claimed successes but it was often a
double-edged success, there were some benefits for masspeople but at the
same time the elite profited also.

*The process of the abolition of slavery *is often described as a success
for people who found that black slaves were also human and that slavery was
a violation of human rights as we should say nowadays. Abolition seemed a
victory for humans who put the well-being of masspeople in front. The facts
tell a different story.
In the struggle for abolition masspeople were hardly involved. Occasionally
a rebellion of slaves demanded attention but these rebellions were mostly
crushed with much violence. The struggle, that lasted a century, was led by
middle class people supported by some elitepeople who saw that society could
be more profitable without slavery. More and more the elite realised it
needed abolition to advance society for their own benefit. That also some
masspeople benefited did not matter, power relations were not changed.

*After the French Revolution*, probably as a result of the new paradigm
Freedom, Equality and Brotherhood (Liberté, Egalité et Fraternité), slavery
was abolished in France in 1794. But a few years later, the influence of the
new paradigm was already weakening, *Napoleon re-established slavery* and a
revolt of slaves in Haiti was bloodily crushed. Only fifty years later
slavery was completely banned in France.

In the United States the abolition of slavery was also a long process.
Around 1800 after the Revolutionary War slaveholders were "persuaded to free
their slaves". The elite seldom attacks it own sons so slavery was not yet
lawfully abolished. Ten percent of the slaveholders bowed to the arguments
that were in complete agreement with the elitist paradigm. "Slaveholders
were encouraged to abolish slavery because the economics of the area was
changing. It was shifting from labour-intensive tobacco culture to mixed
crop cultivation that did not need so many slaves" (not one word about the
question of slaves were indeed also human).

*Only in 1865 slavery was completely abolished.* You may guess how much
human misery was caused to masspeople in this half century. Slavery was only
abolished because the elite from the North of the USA had a different kind
of economy that needed more independent workers though they still "felt
threatened as well because they were uneasy at the prospect of the sudden
addition to the labour pool of a huge number of freed labourers who were
used to work for very little and thus seen as willing to undercut prevailing
wages" (again the money argument). "Northerners came to view slavery as the
very antithesis of the good society, as well as a threat to the own
fundamental values and interests". (quotes from Wikipedia).

* *

*The interests of an important part of the elite demanded the abolition of
slavery* and secondary was the idea that all humans had to be treated as
humans. The human factor was small in comparison to the money and power
factor, to the threat that slavery should undermine the eliteworld.

Most "improvements" in the massworld are carried through because the elite
acknowledges that the economy is changing. They make new rules and the
influence of organisations of masspeople on these decisions is negligible.
The forty-hour week, abolition of child labour, rising salaries of workers,
minimum wage, compulsory education, state pensions etceteras are first of
all products of elitist think tanks. Masspeople benefited from these
decisions but their influence on these decisions was minimal and the cleft
between mass- and eliteworld remained very wide.

*The elite brings change when it is needed – for its own paradigm*. What the
elite does is mostly compatible with this paradigm. Therefore society cannot
change fundamentally by the kind of mass actions we have seen in the past.

*The Vietnam War.*

The war was part of a power struggle on a world scale between different
elites.
Why was it stopped?
Because of the protests of many masspeople all over the world? Don't believe
it. It was stopped because the interests of the American elite were
undermined. The war was too costly, it undermined the grip on the own masses
because of the 50000 dead American soldiers (not the millions of dead
Vietnamese), trade with other countries was endangered by a growing
anti-American feeling, etceteras. All these reasons had their origin in the
danger that the dominant paradigm that the elite always has to be on top was
losing its influence.

*Massive protests had hardly any influence* but self-appointed mass leaders
still continue to propagate that it is necessary to fight for improvements
within the framework of the elitist paradigm. They ask elitepeople to
improve the massworld while the elite is in the first place occupied by
efforts to improve the own world. Its mind is directed on what happens in
the eliteworld and not on what happens in the massworld. Actions that do not
contribute to the change of mind of leaders should be ignored. But leaders
of mass organisations still demand higher salaries (though the income of the
elite rises faster), electric cars (though the interests of the oil elite is
more important), no hunger in the world (though the agricultural elite may
not be hurt), no more wars as in Vietnam (but the wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan just go on and new wars (Iran etceteras) are already on the
agenda.

*Mass protests have hardly any influence. *The elite does not change its
indecent attitude. Wars and violence hurt in the first place masspeople and
you can find them almost anywhere. In 2001 there was some kind of war in a
third of all countries. That situation has not changed. (See the 8th Letter
of an Autonomous Thinker Too many Wars,*
http://members.chello.nl/jsteenis/letter8.htm)*.* *

Maybe some problems will be solved and perhaps, perhaps mass actions
contributed something positive but new problems arrive just because the
world is built on the wrong paradigm that turns around money and not around
people.

Many masspeople realise that, they lose their fighting spirit and will not
be involved anymore in political activities. They miss fundamental results
they acknowledge that all change only occurs within the elitist boundaries.

Mass actions miss fundamental ideas because they are not built on an own
paradigm. *They are a reaction on what the elite is doing.* Actions are not
based on the creativity and autonomy of masspeople nor do they put pressure
on elitepeople who take decisions. Moreover most actions take place in the
own massworld and the centre of power that is deep in the eliteworld is not
touched at all.

In my 90th Letter of an Autonomous Thinker, *Wrong kind of action* (*
http://members.chello.nl/jsteenis/letter90.htm*) I commented on a German
action group who made some principal mistakes. I named six points, stay out
of prison, do not overestimate yourself, behave like a fish in the water,
aim to change the mind of leaders, do not destroy insured things, do hardly
send messages to the media.

The new paradigm demands that persons have to stand in the centre.

- Carry out actions that are hardly punishable. In prison you can't do
anything.
- Realise you are a fly and not a tiger and that you cannot change the world
in one action.
- Do not be a professional activist but remain in touch with the people
around you, remain on trusted grounds.
- Try to influence persons with power, put pressure on them and avoid fellow
masspeople that defend the top.
- Do not attack buildings because damage will be repaired and the mind of
leaders will not be influenced.
- Do not try to win the media for your message because most media are owned
by people who are very close to the elite.

*Remember that all what happens is done by people, people stand central,
thus put pressure on people who do not consider that all people have equal
status. *

Most protests of the past were useless. I advise to stop doing things that
have no result. Do not participate in actions thought of and led by others,
you have to control your own situation, do not remain a secondary citizen in
actions – you want to be a real human isn't it?

Last but not least, direct all your energy on those people who use the
elitist paradigm to improve their own world. Use an own paradigm that will
be in the interest of all people. When not all people get an equal status,
all actions will be futile.

Some last remarks.
- *I have disregarded activities of people who want a society that is built
on a different system – be it communist, fundamentalist or something
else.*Not the system must change but the people. Societies built on
new systems
will be comparable with old societies, an elite on top and the masses down
under.

- I have also disregarded activities of people who wait for the collapse of
the present society, be it for political or for religious reasons. Most
people who wait for a catastrophe, wait till heaven comes down on earth are
not socially active, they withdraw in their own small group in which they
discuss with each other how the new society must look like. They forget that
a New Society never comes into being when the road to this society is not
taken into consideration.

- I disregard also people who are socially active with the purpose to
improve the present society within the existing power relations.
- I concentrate on people who are socially active in taking the road to a
different kind of society, a society were the mind of leaders is changed in
such a way that all people are considered to have equal status.

More information can be found in the following articles published in the
series *Letter of an Autonomous Thinker:*

1. *Leftist actions are not effective (
http://members.chello.nl/jsteenis/letter1.htm)*

18. *Is the Movement dead?* *(http://members.chello.nl/jsteenis/letter18.htm
)*

19. *The Movement moves again* *(
http://members.chello.nl/jsteenis/letter19.htm)*

20. *The end of demonstrations?* *(
http://members.chello.nl/jsteenis/letter20.htm)*

40. *The road to the future* *(
http://members.chello.nl/jsteenis/letter40.htm)*

41. *Change not improvement* *(
http://members.chello.nl/jsteenis/letter41.htm)*

47. *The future is needed in actions (
http://members.chello.nl/jsteenis/letter47.htm)*

88. *Protest is not enough* *(http://members.chello.nl/jsteenis/letter88.htm
)*

90. *Wrong kind of action (http://members.chello.nl/jsteenis/letter90.htm) *

Four eyes monster

Arin Crumley's and Susan Buice's much-admired internet project Four Eyed
Monsters has now been released on DVD. The first feature length movie to
be uploaded to YouTube in its entirety, for a period of two months in
2007, this milestone event caused the blog-o-sphere to erupt and instantly
made the film an internet cult classic.

In addition to the feature, the DVD includes thirteen video podcasts,
which were created as an extension to the story and which follow the
journey of the filmmakers from when the film first was accepted to the
Slamdance Film Festival, through to their various efforts to
self-distribute the film in the United States. The package is also
complimented by the wonderful soundtrack, which includes some of the best
up-and-coming indie bands in the US, alongside such recognizable names as
The Brian Jonestown Massacre and The Spinto Band.

Our friends over at Dogwoof have kindly agreed to give away three copies
of the DVD / CD package to the first correct replies to the following
question: What was the name of the recent documentary which charted the
fortunes of The Brian Jonestown Massacre? Please send your answers to
oli*at*dogwoof.com

Arin Crumley will be speaking at this year's Power to the Pixel conference
at the London film Festival: http://powertothepixel.com/

http://www.foureyedmonsters.com/

Friday, September 12, 2008

Undercurrents training in a comic




Just discovered how to make a comic..looks groovy don't it?

Wales not on TV


Welsh Heritage Minister Alun Ffred Jones has called on the BBC and other broadcasters to increase the amount of network television produced in Wales.

The comments are in response to a report from the Welsh assembly's broadcasting committee.The minister said Wales was "an invisible nation" on British television.

He echoes a BBC review which is looking into how Wales is covered by network programmes following concern...more

Newspapers and media contacts

* www.newspapersoc.org.uk
 - details of most newspaper titles in Britain.
* http://www.newsquest.co.uk/portfolio2/newspapers/ - details of many local & regional newspapers

Radio stations
* www.radio-now.co.uk - links to websites of all radio stations throughout Britain.

Television stations
* www.mediauk.com - all media with a directory of television, radio stations, and newspapers throughout the UK.

Work in a newsroom?

Breaking News – Ever wanted to work in a newsroom?
Connections from Media Trust is offering you the opportunity to experience the buzz and excitement of a corporate media newsroom for a few days.

If you currently work for a charity and have some experience of media relations, this is your chance to apply for a short-term placement at a top media organisation. Options include regional, local and national newspapers, the BBC (TV and radio), ITN and Heat magazine.

Selected applicants will get to shadow experienced news journalists and producers and discover how editorial ideas are developed and what the media considers to be a newsworthy story. Most importantly you'll also learn how to to improve your charity's relationship with the media and how to gain more publicity for its activities.

All placements will take place during November and December 2008. For more information, terms and conditions and how to apply please visit www.mediatrust.org/mediaconnections.

Thursday, September 11, 2008

Funds for films


We are pleased to announce that Bridging the Gap 6 is now open for
applications, on the theme of 'Future'.

Apply here: http://docscene.cmail1.com/l/510181/4l61dj4y4/y

We are looking to develop 12 short documentaries considering the theme
of 'Future' which will be ready to be pitched to a panel of experts on
10 December. The panel will commission 7 projects which will then go
through further training. Confirmed tutors this year include Marc
Isaacs and US story consultant Fernanda Rossi. Delivery of the final
projects will be on 6 April 2009. We are looking for strong visual
ideas with cinematic scope. You can now watch past films on
http://docscene.cmail1.com/l/510181/4l61dj4y4/6

This scheme is open to all filmmakers based in the UK, and
particularly aims to bridge the gap between training/graduation and a
first broadcast, and those filmmakers who have not made documentaries for
the big screen. We are especially interested in filmmakers from
diverse and under-represented backgrounds, and would like to encourage
Scottish stories too. Unfortunately, we cannot accept applications
from students in full time education.

SDI welcomes applications from producers without a project. Selected
producers will be able to attend selected development workshops and
are free to network with the directors for possible collaboration.

Free Public Masterclasses kick off on Fri 17 October 2008, 2pm at eca.
For those of you who do not have a project in mind but are still
looking to improve your skills please note that throughout the year we
will be hosting a number of masterclasses by internationally
recognised speakers and filmmakers from the industry. These free of
charge and are open to everybody.

For details of masterclasses, please check our website nearer the time.

We're also hosting Outreach Workshops in Inverness (18 Sept),
Manchester (19 Sept), Norwich (19 Sept) & Nottingham (18 Sept) next
week.